<html><head></head><body style="word-wrap: break-word; -webkit-nbsp-mode: space; -webkit-line-break: after-white-space; ">He also says disy:l for Sunday. The prefix (dy' in KK) is only ever du, de, or dew in tradiitonal Cornish.<div>I also think is rather sweet the way he pronounces the word Kembrek with a half-long stressed vowel.</div><div>It was always short of course < *Kombrogika.</div><div><br></div><div>Nicholas</div><div><br><div><div>On 12 Dec 2013, at 20:55, Michael Everson wrote:</div><br class="Apple-interchange-newline"><blockquote type="cite"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="border-collapse: separate; font-family: Helvetica; font-style: normal; font-variant: normal; font-weight: normal; letter-spacing: normal; line-height: normal; orphans: 2; text-align: -webkit-auto; text-indent: 0px; text-transform: none; white-space: normal; widows: 2; word-spacing: 0px; -webkit-border-horizontal-spacing: 0px; -webkit-border-vertical-spacing: 0px; -webkit-text-decorations-in-effect: none; -webkit-text-size-adjust: auto; -webkit-text-stroke-width: 0px; font-size: medium; ">A splendid example of Cymricization. [dærː] instead of [dæːɹ] is quite telling.<span class="Apple-converted-space"> </span><br></span></blockquote></div><br></div></body></html>