<html><head></head><body style="word-wrap: break-word; -webkit-nbsp-mode: space; -webkit-line-break: after-white-space; "><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Verdana" style="font-size: 13px;">There is no justification for byghan anyway, since byghan is unattested in the texts. It occurs in PNN but toponymy is likely to maintain archaic forms. In PA beghan occurs twice. In other texts the commonest form is byan, byen. Tregear writes bean, Lhuyd bîan. The use of gh between syllables in UC was suggested by forms in PA, which was Nance's foundation text. </font><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-family: Verdana; font-size: 13px; ">PA writes arghans 'silver', vghelder, peghes, yrghys, nagha, fleghys, etc.</span><div><div><br><div><div>On 25 Mar 2014, at 10:17, Daniel Prohaska wrote:</div><br class="Apple-interchange-newline"><blockquote type="cite"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="border-collapse: separate; font-family: Helvetica; font-style: normal; font-variant: normal; font-weight: normal; letter-spacing: normal; line-height: normal; orphans: 2; text-align: -webkit-auto; text-indent: 0px; text-transform: none; white-space: normal; widows: 2; word-spacing: 0px; -webkit-border-horizontal-spacing: 0px; -webkit-border-vertical-spacing: 0px; -webkit-text-decorations-in-effect: none; -webkit-text-size-adjust: auto; -webkit-text-stroke-width: 0px; font-size: medium; ">This is a step back into the dark ages. Not only does intervocalic ‹gh› prompt an unlikely pronunciation, it actually prompts mispronunciation as native English speakers who learn and speak Cornish prequently subsitute [k] for aspired [x] or [ɦ] ("arkans, mikturn" etc.). I have yet to hear KK-supporters pronounce, e.g. ‹byghan› 'small, little' as recommended by Ken George as [ˈbɪˑɦan]:<span class="Apple-converted-space"> </span><br></span></blockquote></div><br></div></div></body></html>