<html><head></head><body style="word-wrap: break-word; -webkit-nbsp-mode: space; -webkit-line-break: after-white-space; "><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Verdana" style="font-size: 13px;">I have mentioned this before but it is perhaps worth repeating.</font><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Verdana" style="font-size: 13px;">When I was recently at the Kescůssulyans I noticed a little book for</font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Verdana" style="font-size: 13px;">children on the stall of the Cowethas/Kowethas.</font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Verdana" style="font-size: 13px;">The title was</font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Verdana" style="font-size: 13px;"> </font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Verdana" style="font-size: 13px;">STERENN AN KOLIN KERNOW.</font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Verdana" style="font-size: 13px;"><br></font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Verdana" style="font-size: 13px;">I think that this title was meant to be understood as </font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Verdana" style="font-size: 13px;">'Sterenn the Cornish Puppy'. Unfortunately it cannot bear that sense.</font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Verdana" style="font-size: 13px;">If it means anything it could possibly mean 'The star of the puppy of Cornwall', but the syntax is still wrong.</font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Verdana" style="font-size: 13px;"><br></font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Verdana" style="font-size: 13px;">The problem arises from the difficulty in the Celtic languages of having indefinite</font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Verdana" style="font-size: 13px;">nouns dependent on definite ones. </font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Verdana" style="font-size: 13px;"><br></font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Verdana" style="font-size: 13px;">In Irish for example to say 'a king of France' one has to say rí de ríthe na Fraince i.e. a king of the kings of France,</font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Verdana" style="font-size: 13px;">and for 'a city bus' (as distinct from a country bus) one has to say bus de chuid na cathrach</font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Verdana" style="font-size: 13px;">i.e. 'a bus of the share of the city'.</font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Verdana" style="font-size: 13px;"><br></font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Verdana" style="font-size: 13px;">The same rule applies in Cornish, though Nance did not seem to have understood it properly</font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Verdana" style="font-size: 13px;">so he writes *an Yeth Kernow for Yeth Kernow 'the language of Cornwall'</font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Verdana" style="font-size: 13px;">and Lyver *an Pymp Marthus Seleven for Lyver Pymp Marthus Seleven.</font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Verdana" style="font-size: 13px;">Since Kernow and Seleven are both definite, the nouns dependent upon them are all definite. </font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Verdana" style="font-size: 13px;"><br></font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Verdana" style="font-size: 13px;">If one wants to say 'Sterenn, a Cornish puppy'</font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Verdana" style="font-size: 13px;">one would need to write (and I am using the orthography of the author) one of the following:</font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Verdana" style="font-size: 13px;"><br></font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Verdana" style="font-size: 13px;">STERENN, KOLIN DHIWORTH KERNOW</font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Verdana" style="font-size: 13px;">STERENN, KOLIN A GERNOW</font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Verdana" style="font-size: 13px;">KOLIN A GERNOW, STERENN Y HANOW</font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Verdana"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 13px;"><br></span></font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Verdana"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 13px;">If one wants to say 'Sterenn, the Cornish puppy' one would need to write:</span></font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Verdana"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 13px;"><br></span></font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Verdana"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 13px;">STERENN, AN KOLIN A GERNOW</span></font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Verdana"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 13px;">STERENN, AN KOLIN DHIWORTH KERNOW</span></font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Verdana"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 13px;">though neither is very happy since either could mean 'the Star of the puppy of Cornwall'.</span></font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Verdana"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 13px;"><br></span></font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Verdana"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 13px;">Perhaps </span></font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Verdana"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 13px;"><br></span></font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Verdana"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 13px;">AN KOLIN A GERNOW, STERENN Y HANOW would be the best rendering.</span></font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Verdana"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 13px;"><br></span></font></div><div><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-family: Verdana; font-size: 13px; ">The expression Yeth an Weryn is objectionable for the same reason.</span></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Verdana"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 13px;">It can only mean 'the Lanuage of the People' and is ipso facto definite.</span></font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Verdana"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 13px;">It is of doubtful validity anywhere since gweryn has been borrowed from Welsh</span></font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Verdana"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 13px;">and is unattested in Cornish. In more authentic Cornish the phrase would be</span></font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Verdana"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 13px;">Tavas an Bobel or possible Yęth an Bobel.</span></font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Verdana"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 13px;"><br></span></font></div><div><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-family: Verdana; font-size: 13px; ">i have recently heard AN GOOL PYRAN. This is also incorrect.</span></div><div><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-family: Verdana; font-size: 13px; ">Pyran is a proper noun and is definite. The article is not merely unnecessary, it is incorrect.</span></div><div><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-family: Verdana; font-size: 13px; "><br></span></div><div><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-family: Verdana; font-size: 13px; ">On Youtube there is a video from 1964 of the first wedding ever in Cornish, which took place in the parish church of St Piran, Perranaworthal.</span></div><div><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-family: Verdana; font-size: 13px; ">The commentary begins with a shot of the church, the flag of St Piran fluttering in front of it and the spoken words:</span></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Verdana"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 13px;">AN EGLOS SEN PYRAN. This is incorrect; the narrator should have said EGLOS SEN PYRAN 'the church of St Piran' or better still</span></font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Verdana"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 13px;">EGLOS PYRAN 'the church of St Piran'.</span></font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Verdana"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 13px;"><br></span></font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Verdana"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 13px;">Pyran is a proper name, it is therefore definite; any noun governed by it is therefore also definite; the definite artice is not required and indeed is incorrect.</span></font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Verdana" style="font-size: 13px;"><br></font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Verdana" style="font-size: 13px;">Nicholas</font></div><div><br></div><div><br></div></body></html>