<html><head><meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html charset=us-ascii"></head><body style="word-wrap: break-word; -webkit-nbsp-mode: space; -webkit-line-break: after-white-space;"><font face="Verdana" size="2">In his 1952 English-Cornish dictionary under 'hungry' Nance gives <i>nownek</i> without an asterisk. </font><div><font face="Verdana" size="2">The word does not seem to be attested. <i>Nown</i> 'hunger'  is not common either, being attested as</font></div><div><font face="Verdana" size="2"><i>naun</i> in OCV, once as <i>noun</i> in OM and twice in BK, spelt <i>nawn</i> and <i>neun</i>. Since Nance didn't know BK</font></div><div><font face="Verdana" size="2">he was relying on OCV and OM. </font></div><div><font face="Verdana" size="2">Under 'hunger' Nance also gives <i>ewlek</i> without an asterisk. This word does not seem to be attested either. </font></div><div><font face="Verdana" size="2">Nance also gives <i>gwag</i> (UC <i>gwak</i>) for 'hungry'. This would seem to be the default word in Cornish:</font></div><div><font face="Verdana" size="2"><br></font></div><div><font face="Verdana" size="2"><i>Ha pereeg e penes doganze Jorna ha doganze Noze: e ve ouga nena <b>Gwage</b></i> 'And when he had fasted forty days and forty nights, he was then hungry' Rowe <br></font><div><div style="margin: 0px;"><font face="Verdana" size="2"><i><b>Gwag</b> ove, rave gawas haunsell?</i> 'I am hungry, shall I have breakfast?' ACB F f verso.</font></div></div></div><div style="margin: 0px;"><font face="Verdana" size="2"><br></font></div><div style="margin: 0px;"><font face="Verdana" size="2">See <i>Geryow Gwir </i>for further examples.</font></div><div style="margin: 0px;"><font face="Verdana" size="2"><br></font></div><div style="margin: 0px;"><font face="Verdana" size="2">Nicholas</font></div><div style="margin: 0px;"><font face="Verdana" size="2"><br></font></div></body></html>