<html><head><meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html charset=us-ascii"></head><body style="word-wrap: break-word; -webkit-nbsp-mode: space; -webkit-line-break: after-white-space;"><font face="Verdana">The lengthening is not the real question, since we don't know whether the y in <i>clethyow</i> is actually long.</font><div><font face="Verdana">The question is whether <thy> [Dj] can be elided after a stressed vowel.</font></div><div><font face="Verdana">The answer is yes. Rowe writes: <i>ha an Gie <b>oyah</b> teler an gye en Noath</i> 'and they knew that they were naked',</font></div><div><font face="Verdana">where <i>oya</i> is for earlier wothya, e.g. <i>A haha me a <b>wothya</b></i> 'A, haha, I knew' BM 1416.</font></div><div><font face="Verdana">Notice also that Tregear writes <i>gwrythyans</i> for <i>gwryans</i> 'doing, activity' three times TH 14, 25a, 34a. This is by hypercorrection,</font></div><div><font face="Verdana">because he knew that <thy> was often elided. </font></div><div><font face="Verdana"><br></font></div><div><font face="Verdana">Nicholas</font></div><div><br></div><div><br><div><div>On 4 Jul 2014, at 14:55, Linus Band <<a href="mailto:linusband@gmail.com">linusband@gmail.com</a>> wrote:</div><br class="Apple-interchange-newline"><blockquote type="cite"><span style="font-family: Helvetica; font-size: 12px; font-style: normal; font-variant: normal; font-weight: normal; letter-spacing: normal; line-height: normal; orphans: auto; text-align: start; text-indent: 0px; text-transform: none; white-space: normal; widows: auto; word-spacing: 0px; -webkit-text-stroke-width: 0px; float: none; display: inline !important;">Do we have more examples of this compensatory lengthening?</span></blockquote></div><br></div></body></html>