<html><head><meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html charset=us-ascii"></head><body style="word-wrap: break-word; -webkit-nbsp-mode: space; -webkit-line-break: after-white-space;"><br><div><font face="Verdana" size="2">A number of points need to be made here. The entry: <b><i>Kendereu A.</i> </b>[for Armorican]<b> <i>a Cousin-german</i></b></font></div><div><font face="Verdana" size="2">is not attested in the first edition of Borlase's vocabulary but it does occur in the second.</font></div><div><font face="Verdana" size="2">I assume that the Breton word <i>Kendereu</i> taken from Lhuyd s.vv. <i>Consobrinus </i>and <i>Patruelis </i>is the</font></div><div><font face="Verdana" size="2">origin of the item in Borlase. The word is Breton. There is no evidence from Lhuyd, nor from</font></div><div><font face="Verdana" size="2">the Old Cornish Vocabulary nor from any other source (Pryce is, I take it, based on Borlase) for</font></div><div><font face="Verdana" size="2">the word *<b>kenderow</b> in Cornish. OCV cites no word for 'cousin'. There is no evidence at all for a Cornish word *<b>kenytherow</b> 'female cousin'.</font></div><div><font face="Verdana" size="2"><br></font></div><div><font face="Verdana" size="2">The only attested word for 'cousin' seems to be <b>cosyn</b>, plural <b>cosyns</b>. This has almost certainly been</font></div><div><font face="Verdana" size="2">borrowed from Middle English, not Middle French.</font></div><div><font face="Verdana" size="2"><br></font></div><div><font face="Verdana" size="2">It may well be helpful to distinguish a female cousin from a male cousin and to adopt two Breton words into</font></div><div><font face="Verdana" size="2">Cornish as <b>kenderow</b> and <b>kenytherow</b> may or may not be a good idea. Against that one should remember</font></div><div><font face="Verdana" size="2">that English cannot distinguish the gender of cousin without further specification. My preference is always</font></div><div><font face="Verdana" size="2">for the attested word over the borrowing. I shall continue to use <b>cosyn</b>, <b>cosyns</b> for cousins of either gender.</font></div><div><font face="Verdana" size="2"><br></font></div><div><font face="Verdana" size="2"><b>Chaden</b> 'chain' in Borlase is Breton, not Cornish. Pre-occlusion occurs only after short stressed vowels, not long vowels/diphthongs.</font></div><div><font face="Verdana" size="2">The attested Cornish word for 'chain' is <b>chain</b> m., pl. <b>chainys</b>; and 'to chain' is <b>chainya</b>:</font></div><div><font face="Verdana" size="2"><br></font></div><div><div style="margin: 0px;"><font face="Verdana" size="2"><i>y gelmy fast why a wra gans louan ha <b>chaynys</b> yen</i> 'you shall bind him fast with a rope and cold chains' PC 2059-60</font></div><div style="margin: 0px;"><div style="margin: 0px;"><font face="Verdana" size="2"><i>Kymmar Ke ha carhar a in <b>chaynys</b> fyne</i> 'Take Ke and imprison him in fine chains' BK 397-98</font></div><div style="margin: 0px;"><font face="Verdana" size="2"><i>in pyth downe yth of towles abarth in efarn kelmys gans <b>chayne</b> tane a dro thymo</i> 'I have been cast into a deep pit within hell with a chain of fire around me' CW 329-3</font></div><div style="margin: 0px;"><font face="Verdana" size="2"><br></font></div><div style="margin: 0px;"><div style="margin: 0px;"><div style="margin: 0px;"><font face="Verdana" size="2"><i>henna lemen y fyllyth rag pur fast yth os <b>chenys</b></i> 'now you will fail in that, for you have been chained fast' BM 3808-09</font></div></div><div style="margin: 0px;"><font face="Verdana" size="2"><i>trewethek syght yv helma gueles den yonk tek certan <b>cheynys</b> in keth vaner ma</i>  'this is a pitiful sight to see a young man chained in this very way' BM 3823-25</font></div><div style="margin: 0px;"><div style="text-align: left; margin: 0px;"><font face="Verdana" size="2"><i>Awoys ov bones <b>cheynys</b> a tefes dym nebes neys me a pylse the pen blogh </i>'Since I have been chained, were you to come a little closer to me I would strip your bald head' BM 3826-28.</font></div><div style="text-align: left; margin: 0px;"><font face="Verdana" size="2"><br></font></div><div style="text-align: left; margin: 0px;"><font face="Verdana" size="2">For 'chain' Nance suggests *<i>cadon</i> f. borrowed from Welsh and Breton. Again, I prefer the attested items, to unattested borrowings.</font></div><div style="text-align: left; margin: 0px;"><font face="Verdana" size="2"><br></font></div><div style="text-align: left; margin: 0px;"><font face="Verdana" size="2">Nicholas</font></div></div></div></div></div></body></html>