<html><head><meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html charset=windows-1252"></head><body style="word-wrap: break-word; -webkit-nbsp-mode: space; -webkit-line-break: after-white-space;">Yes, Dan. But Nance's purism was so inconsistent. That is the mystery.<div><br><div><div>On 24 Jul 2014, at 12:24, Daniel Prohaska <<a href="mailto:daniel@ryan-prohaska.com">daniel@ryan-prohaska.com</a>> wrote:</div><br class="Apple-interchange-newline"><blockquote type="cite"><div><span style="font-family: Helvetica; font-size: 12px; font-style: normal; font-variant: normal; font-weight: normal; letter-spacing: normal; line-height: normal; orphans: auto; text-align: start; text-indent: 0px; text-transform: none; white-space: normal; widows: auto; word-spacing: 0px; -webkit-text-stroke-width: 0px; float: none; display: inline !important;">You say 'it is a mystery to me why Nance should have preferred the unattested borrowing'. It's really no mystery at all; ‹tastya› and other such loan words are borrowing from English, whereas it was very much the fashion of the day, or should I say the century, to aspire to "pure" languages, with few loan words.<span class="Apple-converted-space"> </span></span></div></blockquote></div><br></div></body></html>