<html><head></head><body style="word-wrap: break-word; -webkit-nbsp-mode: space; -webkit-line-break: after-white-space; "><div><div>On Jul 29, 2014, at 2:42 PM, Eddie Climo wrote:</div><br class="Apple-interchange-newline"><blockquote type="cite"><div>On 29 Jul 2014, at 13:13, Eddie Climo <<a href="mailto:eddie_climo@yahoo.co.uk">eddie_climo@yahoo.co.uk</a>> wrote:<br><blockquote type="cite">To be blunt, the arguments of (self-styled) academic  'experts' on this issue would be much more convincing if they could speak Kernewek and sound like Kernowyon rather than foreigners.<br></blockquote><br>Having re-read this observation, I should perhaps clarify that I didn't have in mind Kernewegoryon whose roots are in other Celtic countries. They tend to bring a delightful flavour to the language, as does (saw dha revrons, mata!) the charming soft Austrian 'sawor' that tinges Dan's excellent pronunciation—always a pleasure to listen to!<br>Eddie Climo.</div></blockquote><br></div><div><br></div><div>Eddie, </div><div><br></div><div>Thanks, I had a good little laugh at this one, no doubt intended as a compliment, but I now have serious doubts about the interpretation of what you hear ;-) There is very little Austrian 'sawor' in my German let alone my Cornish ;-) ! I'm born to an English mother whose grandparents were Irish, so I also fall into your first category as well. We actually spoke English at home, so I'm a native speaker of English as much as the rest of you! </div><div><br></div><div>My main model for pronunciation, as I have written before, was Richard Gendall. I listen to his tapes accompanying the course book "Curnooack Hethow" up and down and also have is "Kernuak en Chy" and "The Language of Our Cornish Forefathers". Sadly, I don't think he ever made an audio accompaniment to his excellent "Tavas a Ragadazow". </div><div><br></div><div>Dan</div><div><br></div><div><br></div><div><br></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" size="6"><br></font></div></body></html>