<html><head></head><body><div style="font-family: Verdana;font-size: 12.0px;"><div>Thank you for the citation, Nicholas, which indeed strongly suggests that <yw> was a falling diphthong when preceded by a consonant and followed by a vowel.</div>

<div>Ol an gwella,</div>

<div>Jon</div>

<div class="signature">_____________________________________<br/>
Dr. Jon Mills,<br/>
University of Kent<br/>
http://kent.academia.edu/JonMills</div>

<div> 
<div> 
<div name="quote" style="margin: 10px 5px 5px 10px; padding: 10px 0px 10px 10px; border-left-color: rgb(195, 217, 229); border-left-width: 2px; border-left-style: solid; word-wrap: break-word; -webkit-nbsp-mode: space; -webkit-line-break: after-white-space;">
<div style="margin: 0px 0px 10px;"><b>Sent:</b> Wednesday, July 30, 2014 at 12:08 PM<br/>
<b>From:</b> "Nicholas Williams" <njawilliams@gmail.com><br/>
<b>To:</b> "Standard Cornish discussion list" <spellyans@kernowek.net><br/>
<b>Subject:</b> Re: [Spellyans] The Cornish for 'cousin'</div>

<div name="quoted-content">
<div><font face="Verdana" size="2">A reason for preferring iw to ju is that this appears to have been the pronunciation in traditional Cornish until the death of the language.</font>

<div><font face="Verdana" size="2">Look, for example, at the following from Boson's <i>Duchess of Cornwall's Progress</i>:</font></div>

<div> </div>

<div>
<div style="margin: 0px;"><font face="Verdana" size="2"><i>Why a ra Cavas <b>dr’eeu</b> an gwas Harry ma Poddrak broas</i> [Why a wra cavos der yw an gwas Harry-ma podrak brâs]</font></div>

<div style="margin: 0px;"><font face="Verdana" size="2"><i>Der yw</i> (for earlier <i>Dell yw</i>) is written <dreeu> as though it were [dri:u] or [dri:w] not [drju]. This suggests that at the end of the seventeenth</font></div>

<div style="margin: 0px;"><font face="Verdana" size="2">century yw was [iw] not [ju].</font></div>

<div style="margin: 0px;"> </div>

<div style="margin: 0px;"><font face="Verdana" size="2">There are several examples of ow for ew 'is' in CW, which suggest that the diphthong may on occasion have been treated like the diphthong in</font></div>

<div style="margin: 0px;"><font face="Verdana" size="2">clewes, kewsel. This would imply that the nucleus of the diphthong was the second part, i.e. iw, ew not ju. </font></div>

<div style="margin: 0px;"> </div>

<div style="margin: 0px;"><font face="Verdana" size="2">A common Late spelling of yth yw is ethew, thew. This looks as though it should rhyme with the late spellings Dew 'God', blew 'yellow'. </font></div>

<div style="margin: 0px;"><font face="Verdana" size="2">The ew in both these is surely a falling diphthong.</font></div>

<div style="margin: 0px;"> </div>

<div style="margin: 0px;"><font face="Verdana" size="2">Nicholas</font></div>

<div style="margin: 0px;"> </div>

<div>
<div>On 30 Jul 2014, at 11:24, Jon Mills <<a href="j.mills@email.com" target="_parent">j.mills@email.com</a>> wrote:</div>
 

<blockquote><span style="font: 12px/normal Verdana; text-transform: none; text-indent: 0px; letter-spacing: normal; word-spacing: 0px; float: none; display: inline; white-space: normal; font-size-adjust: none; font-stretch: normal;">The impression that I have from listening to today's speakers is that [ju] predominates whether preceded by a vowel or a consonant, followed by a linking [w] when followed by a vowel. Is there any seriously justifiable reason for proscribing what seems to be commonplace today?</span></blockquote>
</div>
</div>
_______________________________________________ Spellyans mailing list Spellyans@kernowek.net <a href="http://kernowek.net/mailman/listinfo/spellyans_kernowek.net" target="_blank">http://kernowek.net/mailman/listinfo/spellyans_kernowek.net</a></div>
</div>
</div>
</div>
</div></div></body></html>