<html><head><meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html charset=windows-1252"></head><body style="word-wrap: break-word; -webkit-nbsp-mode: space; -webkit-line-break: after-white-space;"><div style="margin: 0px; text-align: justify; font-size: 13px; font-family: Verdana;"><span style="letter-spacing: 0.0px">The default word in the revived language for ‘to argue, to debate’ seems to be <i>dadhla</i>, <i>dala</i> (UC <i>dathla</i>). Although unattested there it has Welsh congener in <i>daddlu</i>. The attested words for ‘to argue, to debate’ are <b><i>argya</i></b>, <b><i>debâtya, dyspűtya</i></b> and <b><i>ręsna</i></b>.</span></div><div style="margin: 0px; text-align: justify; font-size: 13px; font-family: Verdana; min-height: 16px;"><span style="letter-spacing: 0.0px"></span><br></div><div style="margin: 0px 0px 0px 14.2px; text-align: justify; font-size: 13px; font-family: Verdana;"><span style="letter-spacing: 0.0px"><b><i>argye</i></b><i> na moy thy'n ny reys na keusel na moy gerryow</i> PC 2467-68</span></div><div style="margin: 0px 0px 0px 14.2px; text-align: justify; font-size: 13px; font-family: Verdana;"><span style="letter-spacing: 0.0px"><i>Ny thue les agen </i><b><i>argya</i></b><i> kyn feny oma vyketh</i> BM 891-92</span></div><div style="margin: 0px 0px 0px 14.2px; text-align: justify; font-size: 13px; font-family: Verdana;"><span style="letter-spacing: 0.0px"><b><i>argya</i></b><i> orto ny ammont</i> BM 3332</span></div><div style="margin: 0px; text-align: justify; font-size: 13px; font-family: Verdana; min-height: 16px;"><span style="letter-spacing: 0.0px"></span><br></div><div style="margin: 0px 0px 0px 14.2px; text-align: justify; text-indent: -0.1px; font-size: 13px; font-family: Verdana;"><span style="letter-spacing: 0.0px"><i>mara tuen ha </i><b><i>debatya</i></b><i> mas an nyyl party omma ov teberth purguir ny warth</i> BM 3476-79 </span></div><div style="margin: 0px 0px 0px 14.2px; text-align: justify; text-indent: -0.1px; font-size: 13px; font-family: Verdana; min-height: 16px;"><span style="letter-spacing: 0.0px"></span><br></div><div style="margin: 0px 0px 0px 28.4px; text-align: justify; text-indent: -14.2px; font-size: 13px; font-family: Verdana;"><span style="letter-spacing: 0.0px"><i>cayphas re hyrghys thywhy a thos the ierusalem the </i><b><i>dysputye</i></b><i> worth ihesu</i> PC 1648-50</span></div><div style="margin: 0px 0px 0px 28.4px; text-align: justify; text-indent: -14.2px; font-size: 13px; font-family: Verdana;"><span style="letter-spacing: 0.0px"><i>rak me a vyn </i><b><i>dysputye</i></b><i> worth ihesu a nazare</i> PC 1717-18</span></div><div style="margin: 0px; text-align: justify; font-size: 13px; font-family: Verdana; min-height: 16px;"><span style="letter-spacing: 0.0px"></span><br></div><div style="margin: 0px 0px 0px 28.4px; text-align: justify; text-indent: -14.2px; font-size: 13px; font-family: Verdana;"><span style="letter-spacing: 0.0px"><i>Pan a vater a vea hemma thynny omma besy the </i><b><i>resna</i></b><i> warnotha</i> TH 55</span></div><div style="margin: 0px 0px 0px 28.4px; text-align: justify; text-indent: -14.2px; font-size: 13px; font-family: Verdana;"><span style="letter-spacing: 0.0px"><i>ny amownt thymma </i><b><i>resna</i></b><i> genas noy</i> CW 2395-96.</span></div><div style="margin: 0px; text-align: justify; font-size: 13px; font-family: Verdana; min-height: 16px;"><span style="letter-spacing: 0.0px"></span><br></div><div style="margin: 0px; text-align: justify; font-size: 13px; font-family: Verdana;"><span style="letter-spacing: 0.0px">A noun <i>dal</i>, <i>dadhel</i> (UC <i>dathel</i>) ‘argument’ is also commonly used, although it is also not attested in the texts. The word for ‘argument’ in traditional Cornish is <b><i>argůment</i></b>, pl. <b><i>argůmentys</i></b>:</span></div><div style="margin: 0px; text-align: justify; font-size: 13px; font-family: Verdana; min-height: 16px;"><span style="letter-spacing: 0.0px"></span><br></div><div style="margin: 0px 0px 0px 28.4px; text-align: justify; text-indent: -14.2px; font-size: 13px; font-family: Verdana;"><span style="letter-spacing: 0.0px"><i>me a'n conclud yredy ma na wothfo gorthyby vn reson thu'm </i><b><i>argument</i></b><i> </i>PC 1659-61</span></div><div style="margin: 0px 0px 0px 14.2px; text-align: justify; font-size: 13px; font-family: Verdana;"><span style="letter-spacing: 0.0px"><i>Na esyn vsya </i><b><i>Argumentys</i></b><i> mas vsya exampels Christ</i> SA 61.</span></div><div style="margin: 0px 0px 0px 14.2px; text-align: justify; font-size: 13px; font-family: Verdana; min-height: 16px;"><span style="letter-spacing: 0.0px"></span><br></div><div style="margin: 0px; text-align: justify; font-size: 13px; font-family: Verdana;"><span style="letter-spacing: 0.0px">All these items (<b>argya </b>< <i>arguen</i>, <b>debâtya </b>< <i>debaten</i>, <b>dyspűtya </b>< <i>disputen</i>, <b>ręsna</b> < <i>resounen</i> and <b>argůment </b>< <i>argument</i>) are borrowing from Middle English, which probably accounts for the popularity of *<i>dadhla</i> and *<i>dadhel</i>. On the other hand <b>argya</b>, <b>ręsna</b> and <b>argůment</b> are all attested in more than one text. This would seem to indicate that they were integral parts of the Cornish lexicon. </span></div><div style="margin: 0px; text-align: justify; font-size: 13px; font-family: Verdana;"><span style="letter-spacing: 0.0px"><br></span></div><div style="margin: 0px; text-align: justify; font-size: 13px; font-family: Verdana;"><span style="letter-spacing: 0.0px">Nicholas</span></div></body></html>