<html><head><meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html charset=us-ascii"></head><body style="word-wrap: break-word; -webkit-nbsp-mode: space; -webkit-line-break: after-white-space;"><font face="Verdana">Not just historical phonology either. /N/ is used when discussing present-day Gaelic phonology (Irish, Scottish Gaelic and Manx).</font><div><font face="Verdana">/N/ in Irish is unlenited as against lenited /n/. And /N'/ and /n'/ are the palatalised equivalents. Some dialects have all four.</font></div><div><font face="Verdana"><br></font></div><div><font face="Verdana">Nicholas</font></div><div><br><div><div>On 6 Aug 2014, at 10:40, Linus Band <<a href="mailto:linusband@gmail.com">linusband@gmail.com</a>> wrote:</div><br class="Apple-interchange-newline"><blockquote type="cite"><span style="font-family: Helvetica; font-size: 12px; font-style: normal; font-variant: normal; font-weight: normal; letter-spacing: normal; line-height: normal; orphans: auto; text-align: start; text-indent: 0px; text-transform: none; white-space: normal; widows: auto; word-spacing: 0px; -webkit-text-stroke-width: 0px; float: none; display: inline !important;">Using /N/ for /n:/ is fairly common in articles discussing Celtic historical phonology.</span></blockquote></div><br></div></body></html>