<html><head><meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html charset=utf-8"></head><body style="word-wrap: break-word; -webkit-nbsp-mode: space; -webkit-line-break: after-white-space;"><font face="Verdana" size="2">The verb <i><b>flerya</b></i> 'to stink' is attested. as is <i><b>fleryys</b></i> 'stinker, smelly person' (for ?*<i><b>fleryus</b></i>). I can't find any Middle Cornish example of <i><b>fler</b></i> 'smell, stink' though <i>odor <b>flair</b></i> occurs in OCV. Notice that Lhuyd gives <i><b>flair</b></i> s.v. <i>odor</i> AB: 4b, 105c. In both cases he puts a dagger in front of the word </font><span style="font-family: Verdana; font-size: small;">to indicate that it is Old Cornish only. The Middle/Late word he cites for 'odour' is</span><i style="font-family: Verdana; font-size: small;"> Saụarn. </i><span style="font-family: Verdana; font-size: small;">This is presumably for *<i>saworen</i>, but is not attested in the MC texts.</span><div><font face="Verdana" size="2"><br></font></div><div><font face="Verdana" size="2">Nicholas<br></font><div><div><font face="Verdana"><br></font></div><div><font face="Verdana"><br></font><div><div>On 24 Nov 2014, at 10:42, Ray Chubb <<a href="mailto:ray@spyrys.org">ray@spyrys.org</a>> wrote:</div><br class="Apple-interchange-newline"><blockquote type="cite"><span style="font-family: Helvetica; font-size: 12px; font-style: normal; font-variant: normal; font-weight: normal; letter-spacing: normal; line-height: normal; orphans: auto; text-align: start; text-indent: 0px; text-transform: none; white-space: normal; widows: auto; word-spacing: 0px; -webkit-text-stroke-width: 0px; float: none; display: inline !important;">I can see nothing wrong with the concept of stinking with a flavour. It is possible that the writer of RD only used 'blas' to give himself a rhyme. Otherwise he could have used the much more appropriate 'fler'.</span></blockquote></div><br></div></div></div></body></html>