<html><head><meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html charset=windows-1252"></head><body style="word-wrap: break-word; -webkit-nbsp-mode: space; -webkit-line-break: after-white-space;"><font size="2" face="Verdana">But Winnie-the-Pooh in perfectly good English, like Alfred the Great, Henry the Eighth, Mack the Knife, Charles the Fat, Robert the Bruce, etc.</font><div><font size="2" face="Verdana">The same is not true for Cornish Winni-an-Pou because the name seems to be identical in syntax with Pobel an Bs, epscop an pow, etc.</font></div><div><font size="2" face="Verdana">It is in the titles of books aimed at children that we must be the most careful to ensure our Cornish means what we think it means.</font></div><div><font size="2" face="Verdana">That is why <u>Steren an Kolyn Kernow</u> was so unfortunate. </font></div><div><font size="2" face="Verdana"><br></font></div><div><font size="2" face="Verdana">Nicholas</font></div><div><br><div><div>On 7 Aug 2015, at 14:23, harry hawkey <<a href="mailto:bendyfrog@live.com">bendyfrog@live.com</a>> wrote:</div><br class="Apple-interchange-newline"><blockquote type="cite"><span style="font-family: Calibri; font-size: 16px; font-style: normal; font-variant: normal; font-weight: normal; letter-spacing: normal; line-height: normal; orphans: auto; text-align: start; text-indent: 0px; text-transform: none; white-space: normal; widows: auto; word-spacing: 0px; -webkit-text-stroke-width: 0px; float: none; display: inline !important;">Young Christopher was doubtless unconcerned with the rigours of English grammar</span></blockquote></div><br></div></body></html>