<html>
  <head>
    <meta content="text/html; charset=windows-1252"
      http-equiv="Content-Type">
  </head>
  <body bgcolor="#FFFFFF" text="#000000">
    So there is some evidence of A. S. D. Smith's rule in the texts, and
    I assume that words ending in <<b>dh</b>> should be included
    in the grammar books, etc. To date, the sub-rule "words ending in
    <<b>dh</b>>" has been omitted.<br>
    <br>
    However, I am not sure what is meant by "<TOTALLY
    UNRELIABLE>".<br>
    <br>
    I agree that there is considerable variation in the texts, and not
    all the rules were followed all of the time. For Revived Cornish, we
    need to normalise the rules -- much as we do with the spelling. It
    is quite likely that different authorities will come to different
    conclusions.<br>
    <br>
    Is there a theory to explain why <<b>s</b>> and <<b>th</b>>
    / <<b>dh</b>> were treated differently from other letters? The
    evidence from the texts seems to indicate that they were treated
    differently.<br>
    <br>
    <br>
    Regards,<br>
    <br>
    Andrew J. Trim<br>
    <br>
    <br>
    <br>
    <div class="moz-cite-prefix">On 23/08/15 13:52, harry hawkey wrote:<br>
    </div>
    <blockquote cite="mid:DUB128-W3803C46099A91CDF1A59F7CB630@phx.gbl"
      type="cite">
      <style><!--
.hmmessage P
{
margin:0px;
padding:0px
}
body.hmmessage
{
font-size: 12pt;
font-family:Calibri
}
--></style>
      <div dir="ltr"><a class="moz-txt-link-abbreviated" href="mailto:ajtrim@msn.com">ajtrim@msn.com</a> wrote:<br>
        <br>
        <blockquote>Again, in Soft mutation, there is no mutation of
          <<b>C</b>>, <<b>D</b>>, <<b>K</b>>, <<b>P</b>>,
          <<b>Qu</b>>, <<b>T</b>> --- after nouns that end
          in <<b>s</b>> or <<b>th</b>>.<br>
          However, <<b>B</b>>, <<b>Ch</b>>, <<b>G</b>>,
          <<b>M</b>> do mutate here.<br>
          <br>
          This last rule appears to have been "invented" by A. S. D.
          Smith. Do we still use this rule? Is there evidence for it in
          the texts? What about words that end in <<b>dh</b>>?
          These have never been mentioned.<br>
        </blockquote>
        <br>
        <TOTALLY UNRELIABLE><br>
        <br>
        <div>After feminine/masculine pl. nouns ending in <th> or
          <s> followed by an adjective I found:<br>
          <br>
          no examples of p-->b<br>
          no examples of c/k-->g<br>
          no examples of t-->d<br>
          <br>
          A few examples of d-->th/dh<br>
          <blockquote>tus tha(Tregear) X 2<br>
          </blockquote>
          <blockquote>fleghes dha(Gwavas, Ten Commandments)<br>
            <br>
          </blockquote>
          Though it looks like there are more examples of no mutation of
          <d> than with.<br>
          <br>
          <br>
        </div>
      </div>
      <br>
      <fieldset class="mimeAttachmentHeader"></fieldset>
      <br>
      <pre wrap="">_______________________________________________
Spellyans mailing list
<a class="moz-txt-link-abbreviated" href="mailto:Spellyans@kernowek.net">Spellyans@kernowek.net</a>
<a class="moz-txt-link-freetext" href="http://kernowek.net/mailman/listinfo/spellyans_kernowek.net">http://kernowek.net/mailman/listinfo/spellyans_kernowek.net</a>
</pre>
    </blockquote>
    <br>
  </body>
</html>