<html><head><meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html charset=windows-1252"></head><body style="word-wrap: break-word; -webkit-nbsp-mode: space; -webkit-line-break: after-white-space;"><font face="Verdana" size="2">We apply the mixed mutation after th with ga, gy because other items clearly cause mixed mutation with ga, gy, eg. y and may for example.</font><div><font face="Verdana" size="2">The early revivalists schematised things so students could learn them, but it is clear that the mutations are much less systematic than we have been</font></div><div><font face="Verdana" size="2">led to believe.</font></div><div><font face="Verdana" size="2">It is obvious for example that mutation is avoided if the mutation would distort the word too greatly.</font></div><div><font face="Verdana" size="2">So we have pur gloryous CW 128 for example and vn wethan gloryes CW 1899. </font></div><div><font face="Verdana" size="2"><br></font></div><div><font face="Verdana" size="2">I have not been able to find any example of spirantisation after ow 'my' before a verbal noun, for example. On the other hand <u>ow cara ve/vy</u> occurs</font></div><div><font face="Verdana" size="2">at least seven times.</font></div><div><font face="Verdana" size="2">We do, however, find spirantisation after aga before a verbal noun, e.g. in<u> thaga hutha</u> CW 968.</font></div><div><font face="Verdana" size="2">Ow + spirantisation with ordinary nouns is not uncommon. </font></div><div><font face="Verdana" size="2"><br></font></div><div><font face="Verdana" size="2">As far as the mixed mutation is concerned, I have always had doubts whether it really was a separate mutation.</font></div><div><font face="Verdana" size="2">In the first place Lhuyd tells us initial f in fyth must be pronounced with [v]. He writes in vw 'alive'.</font></div><div><font face="Verdana" size="2"><br></font></div><div><font face="Verdana" size="2">'and thy wife' is <u>ha'th wrehgty </u>OM 389; <u>ha'th wrek</u> PC 685; <u>hath wreag</u> CW 834. That means</font></div><div><font face="Verdana" size="2">ha'th is followed by lenition. </font></div><div><font face="Verdana" size="2"><br></font></div><div><font face="Verdana" size="2">By the Late Cornish period even lenition is disappearing in many positions. Lhuyd writes dho kymeraz, dho dereval</font></div><div><font face="Verdana" size="2">but he does write dho glouaz as well as dho klouaz and both dho klouaz and dho glouaz.</font></div><div><font face="Verdana" size="2"><br></font></div><div><font face="Verdana" size="2">At some point somebody will have to examine the practice of initial mutation in Middle and Late Cornish.</font></div><div><font face="Verdana" size="2"><br></font></div><div><font face="Verdana" size="2">Nicholas</font></div><div><br></div><div><br></div><div><br><div><div>On 25 Aug 2015, at 21:02, harry hawkey <<a href="mailto:bendyfrog@live.com">bendyfrog@live.com</a>> wrote:</div><br class="Apple-interchange-newline"><blockquote type="cite"><span style="font-family: Calibri; font-size: 16px; font-style: normal; font-variant: normal; font-weight: normal; letter-spacing: normal; line-height: normal; orphans: auto; text-align: start; text-indent: 0px; text-transform: none; white-space: normal; widows: auto; word-spacing: 0px; -webkit-text-stroke-width: 0px; float: none; display: inline !important;">No, that's pretty much what I found.  I guess my next question would then be, what is the origin of this rule?  If there is no good reason for it, surely we should stop using it?</span></blockquote></div><br></div></body></html>