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<body class='hmmessage'><div dir='ltr'><a class="t_atc ICName">Nicholas Williams                   </a>                                                                                    wrote:<br><br>On 25 Aug 2015, at 15:04, harry hawkey <<a href="mailto:bendyfrog@live.com">bendyfrog@live.com</a>> wrote:<div><div><div><div><br class="ecxApple-interchange-newline"><blockquote><span style="font-family:'Times New Roman';font-size:16px;font-style:normal;font-variant:normal;font-weight:normal;letter-spacing:normal;line-height:normal;text-align:start;text-indent:0px;text-transform:none;white-space:normal;word-spacing:0px;display:inline !important;">Note that these instances of final ‹</span><i style="font-family:'Times New Roman';font-size:16px;font-variant:normal;font-weight:normal;letter-spacing:normal;line-height:normal;text-align:start;text-indent:0px;text-transform:none;white-space:normal;word-spacing:0px;"><b>s</b></i><span style="font-family:'Times New Roman';font-size:16px;font-style:normal;font-variant:normal;font-weight:normal;letter-spacing:normal;line-height:normal;text-align:start;text-indent:0px;text-transform:none;white-space:normal;word-spacing:0px;display:inline !important;">› are from Old Cornish /d/, not from original /s/. I don’t know how practical this is for Revived Cornish, but it seems we may have a distinction between ‹</span><b style="font-family:'Times New Roman';font-size:16px;font-style:normal;font-variant:normal;letter-spacing:normal;line-height:normal;text-align:start;text-indent:0px;text-transform:none;white-space:normal;word-spacing:0px;"><i>nos da</i></b><span style="font-family:'Times New Roman';font-size:16px;font-style:normal;font-variant:normal;font-weight:normal;letter-spacing:normal;line-height:normal;text-align:start;text-indent:0px;text-transform:none;white-space:normal;word-spacing:0px;display:inline !important;">› (original /s/), but ‹</span><i style="font-family:'Times New Roman';font-size:16px;font-variant:normal;font-weight:normal;letter-spacing:normal;line-height:normal;text-align:start;text-indent:0px;text-transform:none;white-space:normal;word-spacing:0px;"><b>tus dha</b></i><span style="font-family:'Times New Roman';font-size:16px;font-style:normal;font-variant:normal;font-weight:normal;letter-spacing:normal;line-height:normal;text-align:start;text-indent:0px;text-transform:none;white-space:normal;word-spacing:0px;display:inline !important;">› (original /d/).<span class="ecxApple-converted-space"> <br><br></span></span></blockquote><span style="font-family:'Times New Roman';font-size:16px;font-style:normal;font-variant:normal;font-weight:normal;letter-spacing:normal;line-height:normal;text-align:start;text-indent:0px;text-transform:none;white-space:normal;word-spacing:0px;display:inline !important;"><span class="ecxApple-converted-space"></span></span>I believe this has been wrongly attributed to me by mistake.  Far too well-formed and coherent for it to be one of my paragraphs!<br><br>I note the many examples of /d/ not mutating to /th/ after 'tus' with great sadness - I thought Dan had discovered a new mutation rule for a while.  Still, never mind.<br><br>I don't suppose, Nicholas, that your much bigger and better corpus can provide any examples of mixed mutation of <ga>,<gi>,<ge> or <gy> after 'th, or can it?<br><span style="font-family:'Times New Roman';font-size:16px;font-style:normal;font-variant:normal;font-weight:normal;letter-spacing:normal;line-height:normal;text-align:start;text-indent:0px;text-transform:none;white-space:normal;word-spacing:0px;display:inline !important;"><span class="ecxApple-converted-space"></span></span></div></div></div></div>                                    </div></body>
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