<html><head></head><body><div style="font-family: Verdana;font-size: 12.0px;"><div>
<div>This alternation of <o> ~ <u> comes from Old Norman French and was also adopted in Middle English.</div>

<div>Jon</div>

<div> 
<div name="quote" style="margin:10px 5px 5px 10px; padding: 10px 0 10px 10px; border-left:2px solid #C3D9E5; word-wrap: break-word; -webkit-nbsp-mode: space; -webkit-line-break: after-white-space;">
<div style="margin:0 0 10px 0;"><b>Sent:</b> Tuesday, December 15, 2015 at 4:03 PM<br/>
<b>From:</b> "Nicholas Williams" <njawilliams@gmail.com><br/>
<b>To:</b> "Standard Cornish discussion list" <spellyans@kernowek.net><br/>
<b>Subject:</b> Re: [Spellyans] Ian Jackson: introduction</div>

<div name="quoted-content">
<div>I<font face="Verdana" size="2"> have pointed out (CT §4.4)  that short o and short u may well have been in free variation.</font>

<div>
<div><font face="Verdana" size="2">Thus we find in traditional Cornish the following doublets:</font></div>

<div> </div>

<div><font face="Verdana" size="2">cusca ~ cosca</font></div>

<div><font face="Verdana" size="2">purpos ~ porpos</font></div>

<div><font face="Verdana" size="2">scullya ~ scollya</font></div>

<div><font face="Verdana" size="2">tulla ~ tolla.</font></div>

<div> </div>

<div><font face="Verdana" size="2">Because the SWF does not countenance diacritics, it often uses <o> for <u>, e.g. *onderstondya,</font></div>

<div><font face="Verdana" size="2">when the attested forms have vnder- (v for u to avoid confusion of minims). </font></div>

<div> </div>

<div> </div>

<div><font face="Verdana" size="2">Nicholas</font></div>

<div> 
<div>
<blockquote>
<div>On 15 Dec 2015, at 12:32, Craig Weatherhill <<a href="craig@agantavas.org" target="_parent">craig@agantavas.org</a>> wrote:</div>
 

<div><span style="font-family: Helvetica;font-size: 12.0px;font-style: normal;font-variant: normal;font-weight: normal;letter-spacing: normal;text-indent: 0.0px;text-transform: none;white-space: normal;word-spacing: 0.0px;float: none;display: inline;"> It is common in Cornish speech to render short O as short U, e.g. "dunkey" (donkey).</span></div>
</blockquote>
</div>
</div>
</div>
_______________________________________________ Spellyans mailing list Spellyans@kernowek.net <a href="http://kernowek.net/mailman/listinfo/spellyans_kernowek.net" target="_blank">http://kernowek.net/mailman/listinfo/spellyans_kernowek.net</a></div>
</div>
</div>
</div>
</div></div></body></html>