<html><head><meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html charset=utf-8"></head><body style="word-wrap: break-word; -webkit-nbsp-mode: space; -webkit-line-break: after-white-space;" class="">I would explain matters as follows:<div class=""><br class=""></div><div class="">Old Cornish -d- is assibiliated to -dz-; </div><div class="">This either simplifies to z (written s) or is palatalised to dzh (the sound of English j).</div><div class="">Thus in Middle Cornish one finds both wose, wosa ‘after’ and woge; or gallosek and gallogek.</div><div class="">Such variants forms are dialectal and co-exist.</div><div class="">Late Cornish often has g, j where Middle Cornish has s. This does not mean that -s- has become j, but</div><div class="">rather that LC exhibits the j-form where the s-form is commoner in MC.</div><div class="">It should be noted however that only the reflex of OC -d- can exhibit -j- in Late Cornish.</div><div class="">So lagagow ‘eyes’, the LC plural of lagas < OC lagat is fine.</div><div class="">But words ending in -es like arlodhes, myternes, pehadùres, etc. never contained d. The </div><div class="">final s is the reflex of OC s, and MC s from the Latin feminine suffix -issa.</div><div class="">It is therefore probably not authentic to spell the plural of such words with *-ejow.</div><div class="">The Late Cornish words <i class="">maternas</i> ‘queen’ (<i class="">Ma tha vee treall en cort an <b class="">Vaternes</b></i> Bilbao MS), <i class="">arlodhas</i> (’<i class="">Ma lever bean rebbam dro tho an</i></div><div class=""><i class=""><b class="">Arlothas</b> Curnow</i> NBoson) and LC *<i class="">lenes</i> ‘nun’ (not attested in LC but occurs in OC as <i class="">laines</i> ‘nun’) in my</div><div class="">view should have a plural in -esow rather than -ejow, because the suffix -es in all three derives </div><div class="">from original s not s < d. </div><div class=""><br class=""></div><div class="">It is also to be noted that LC often shows -s- in words that had -d- in OC.</div><div class="">The long forms of bos are a case in point.  One does find -j- forms in Middle Cornish,</div><div class="">e.g. <i class=""><b class="">Eth egas</b> ow kowsal da</i> ‘You speak well’ BK 626.</div><div class="">Generally speaking however Late Cornish prefers the -s- in the long forms of bos  and these are often rhotacised.</div><div class="">Such rhotacism (i.e. r < s) is attested earlier than LC, in later Middle Cornish in fact:</div><div class=""><div style="margin: 0px; line-height: normal;" class=""><i class="">rag <b class="">neg eran cregy</b> nanyle regardia gerryow Dew </i>‘for we do not believe nor regard the words of God’ SA 59.</div></div><div style="margin: 0px; line-height: normal;" class="">This example is from ca 1560, i.e. well within the Middle Cornish period. </div><div style="margin: 0px; line-height: normal;" class=""><br class=""></div><div style="margin: 0px; line-height: normal;" class="">Generally speaking it is fair to say that -j- in Late Cornish and in toponyms derives from OC -d-.</div><div style="margin: 0px; line-height: normal;" class="">Where -s- in Middle Cornish is -s- in Old Cornish, it should probably be -s- in Late Cornish also.</div><div style="margin: 0px; line-height: normal;" class="">The Late Cornish for ‘nuns’ in my view should therefore be written lenesow.</div><div style="margin: 0px; line-height: normal;" class=""><br class=""></div><div style="margin: 0px; line-height: normal;" class=""><br class=""></div><div class="">Nicholas </div></body></html>