<html><head><meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html charset=windows-1252"></head><body style="word-wrap: break-word; -webkit-nbsp-mode: space; -webkit-line-break: after-white-space;" class=""><font face="Verdana" style="font-size: 14px;" class="">In your Concise Dictionary, Craig, you cite Unyredreth from 1563. This toponym is in two parts: Uny and Redreth.</font><div class=""><font face="Verdana" style="font-size: 14px;" class="">The reduced vowel in the second syllable of Redreth seems to indicate that the second element was unstressed. </font></div><div class=""><font face="Verdana" style="font-size: 14px;" class=""><br class=""></font></div><div class=""><font face="Verdana" style="font-size: 14px;" class="">I am grateful to you for drawing attention to the unassibilated dr in Madron.</font></div><div class=""><font face="Verdana" style="font-size: 14px;" class=""><br class=""></font></div><div class=""><font face="Verdana" style="font-size: 14px;" class="">It seems that r in Old Cornish strengthened a preceding d from a lenis (which was assibilated in MC)</font></div><div class=""><font face="Verdana" style="font-size: 14px;" class="">to a fortis, i.e. similar in strength to initial d in such words as da, don, debry, etc. As a result the d did not assibilate in</font></div><div class=""><font face="Verdana" style="font-size: 14px;" class="">MC to dz > z (written s) or in some cases to dz > dzh; e.g. gallosek PC 1906 but gallogek PC 2376.</font></div><div class=""><font face="Verdana" style="font-size: 14px;" class=""><br class=""></font></div><div class=""><font face="Verdana" style="font-size: 14px;" class="">When r occurred before or after d but separated only by a vowel, the same strengthening seems to have occurred,</font></div><div class=""><font face="Verdana" class=""><span style="font-size: 14px;" class="">so we have </span></font><span style="font-family: Verdana; font-size: 14px;" class="">broder ‘brother’, </span><span style="font-family: Verdana; font-size: 14px;" class="">lader ‘thief’,</span><span style="font-family: Verdana; font-size: 14px;" class=""> </span><span style="font-family: Verdana; font-size: 14px;" class="">peswar but peder feminine, Peder/Pedyr ‘Peter’, pehador ‘sinner’, prydyth ‘poet’, lader ‘thief’, predery ‘to think’, preder ‘thought’,  pader ‘prayer’, etc. Notice also hus ‘magic’ PC 2695, BM 3376; but huder ‘enchanter, magician’ OM 565, PC 1831, RD 2004.</span></div><div class=""><font face="Verdana" style="font-size: 14px;" class=""><br class=""></font></div><div class=""><font face="Verdana" style="font-size: 14px;" class="">I seems that the consonant /l/ had the same strengthening effect, so we have scudel ‘dish’ without assibiliation.</font></div><div class=""><font face="Verdana" style="font-size: 14px;" class="">Notice also skians, skiansek but skentyl, skentoleth. </font></div><div class=""><font face="Verdana" style="font-size: 14px;" class=""><br class=""></font></div><div class=""><font face="Verdana" style="font-size: 14px;" class="">Nicholas</font></div><div class=""><br class=""><div><blockquote type="cite" class=""><div class="">On 29 Jan 2016, at 22:21, Craig Weatherhill <<a href="mailto:craig@agantavas.org" class="">craig@agantavas.org</a>> wrote:</div><br class="Apple-interchange-newline"><div class=""><span style="font-family: Helvetica; font-size: 12px; font-style: normal; font-variant: normal; font-weight: normal; letter-spacing: normal; orphans: auto; text-align: start; text-indent: 0px; text-transform: none; white-space: normal; widows: auto; word-spacing: 0px; -webkit-text-stroke-width: 0px; float: none; display: inline !important;" class="">I tried hard to argue the case for Resrudh on the Signage Panel, but was outvoted on that.  (Res- is retained by the SWF names when unstressed.  Rys only when stressed).</span></div></blockquote></div><br class=""></div></body></html>