<html><head><meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html charset=windows-1252"></head><body style="word-wrap: break-word; -webkit-nbsp-mode: space; -webkit-line-break: after-white-space;" class=""><div class="">As far as the SWF is concerned, **<b class=""><i class="">Cammbron</i></b>, if it were thus written, would not necessarily imply **<b class=""><i class="">Cabmbron</i></b>. Although this would be a useful feature, there is no one-to-one correspondence between ‹<b class=""><i class="">mm</i></b>›, ‹<b class=""><i class="">nn</i></b>› and their pre-occluded variants ‹<b class=""><i class="">bm</i></b>›, ‹<b class=""><i class="">dn</i></b>›. Words spelt with ‹<b class=""><i class="">mm</i></b>› and ‹<b class=""><i class="">nn</i></b>› in the SWF either have variants in ‹<b class=""><i class="">bm</i></b>›, ‹<b class=""><i class="">dn</i></b>›, or they don’t. </div><div class=""><br class=""></div><div class="">One could formulate a post hoc rule that says ‹<i class=""><b class="">mm</b></i>› and ‹<b class="">nn</b>› doesn’t usually pre-occlude before a further consonant, but this would hardly be an exclusive rule, as there are words such as ‹<b class=""><i class="">pednsyvik</i></b>› ‘prince’ that do pre-occlude. </div><div class=""><br class=""></div><div class="">A big <b class=""><i class="">meur ras dhe</i></b> Craig for putting in so much time and effort on the signage panel and professionalising it with his vast knowledge of Cornish place names and their history!</div><div class=""><br class=""></div><div class="">Dan</div><div class=""><br class=""></div><br class=""><div><blockquote type="cite" class=""><div class=""><font color="#000000" class="">On 30 Jan 2016, at 14:34, Craig Weatherhill <<a href="mailto:craig@agantavas.org" class="">craig@agantavas.org</a>> wrote:</font></div><br class="Apple-interchange-newline"><div class="">As the first syllable is stressed (as is usual in compounds where the adjective precedes), it should be, in SWF: <Cammbron>, which would also be tolerable.  However, as you point out, that implies Cabm-bron, which never historically occurs.<br class=""><br class="">Craig<br class=""><br class=""><br class=""><br class="">On 2016 Gen 30, at 12:51, Michael Everson wrote:<br class=""><br class=""><blockquote type="cite" class="">On 30 Jan 2016, at 12:45, Ken MacKinnon <<a href="mailto:ken@ferintosh.org" class="">ken@ferintosh.org</a>> wrote:<br class=""><blockquote type="cite" class=""><br class="">Pity about Kammbronn though – Cambronn would have been tolerable.<br class=""></blockquote><br class="">It implies a Cambrodn, though. <br class=""><br class="">Michael Everson * <a href="http://www.evertype.com/" class="">http://www.evertype.com/</a><br class=""></blockquote></div></blockquote></div><br class=""></body></html>