<html><head><meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html charset=windows-1252"></head><body style="word-wrap: break-word; -webkit-nbsp-mode: space; -webkit-line-break: after-white-space;" class=""><font face="Verdana" style="font-size: 14px;" class="">Given that Ty in this toponym does not affricate to ch, we must assume that the name did not contain</font><div class=""><font face="Verdana" style="font-size: 14px;" class="">colloquial or at least spoken elements. In which case the presence of warn, though interesting, is not </font></div><div class=""><font face="Verdana" style="font-size: 14px;" class="">normative for the spoken language. </font></div><div class=""><br class=""></div><div class=""><font face="Verdana" style="font-size: 14px;" class="">It is curious that of all the names with unaffricated t in them which you cite</font></div><div class=""><font face="Verdana" class=""><span style="font-size: 14px;" class="">Tywardreath appears to be the closest in formation to Tywarnheyl, but there is no definite article</span></font></div><div class=""><font face="Verdana" class=""><span style="font-size: 14px;" class="">in it. Indeed Tywarnheyl is the only one which contains the definite article.</span></font></div><div class=""><span style="font-size: 14px; font-family: Verdana;" class="">Is there any reason for this? </span></div><div class=""><span style="font-size: 14px; font-family: Verdana;" class=""><br class=""></span></div><div class=""><span style="font-size: 14px; font-family: Verdana;" class="">Tehidy and Degembris seem to contain personal names. Is it at all possible that Tywarnheyl contains a personal</span></div><div class=""><font face="Verdana" class=""><span style="font-size: 14px;" class="">name and that the analysis of it as Tywarnheyl ‘manor on the estuary’ has arisen by Volksetymologie?</span></font></div><div class=""><font face="Verdana" class=""><span style="font-size: 14px;" class=""><br class=""></span></font></div><div class=""><font face="Verdana" class=""><span style="font-size: 14px;" class="">I ask simply because warn ‘on the’ in Ti Waernel seems rather suspicious, particularly in a name attested in the tenth century.</span></font></div><div class=""><font face="Verdana" class=""><span style="font-size: 14px;" class=""><br class=""></span></font></div><div class=""><span style="font-family: Verdana; font-size: 14px;" class="">Nicholas</span></div><div class=""><br class=""><div><blockquote type="cite" class=""><div class="">On 22 Feb 2016, at 21:24, Craig Weatherhill <<a href="mailto:craig@agantavas.org" class="">craig@agantavas.org</a>> wrote:</div><br class="Apple-interchange-newline"><div class=""><div style="word-wrap: break-word; -webkit-nbsp-mode: space; -webkit-line-break: after-white-space; " class="">war'n occurs consistently in the place-name Tywarnhayle.<div class=""><br class=""></div><div class="">Ti Waernel, Tiwaernhel 960</div><div class="">Tywarnail 1221, Tywarneil 1231</div><div class="">Tywarnail, Trewernayl 1296</div><div class="">Tywarnheil 1303</div><div class="">Tywarnail 1310</div><div class="">Trewerneil 1346</div><div class="">Tuernayl 1391</div><div class="">Tywarnayle 1461</div><div class="">Trewarnayle 1584</div><div class="">Tywarnhaile 1613, 1673, 1680, 1699, c.1720</div><div class="">Tiwarnail 1750</div><div class=""><br class=""></div><div class="">ty, "senior manor" + war'n (on the, upon the", + heyl, "estuary with tidal flats".</div><div class=""><br class=""></div><div class="">(Ty- seems to have been retained for manors perceived to be of high status and, in these names, did not alter to chy-.   Tybesta, Tywarnhayle, Tywardreath, Degembris and Tehidy are examples).</div><div class=""><br class=""></div><div class="">Craig</div><div class=""><br class=""></div><div class=""><br class=""></div><div class=""><br class=""></div><div class=""><br class=""></div><div class=""><br class=""><div class=""><div class="">On 2016 Whe 22, at 21:08, Nicholas Williams wrote:</div><br class="Apple-interchange-newline"><blockquote type="cite" class=""><meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html charset=utf-8" class=""><div style="word-wrap: break-word; -webkit-nbsp-mode: space; -webkit-line-break: after-white-space;" class=""><div class=""><font face="Verdana" style="font-size: 14px;" class="">Thank you, Linus, for the one example.</font></div><font face="Verdana" style="font-size: 14px;" class=""><div class=""><font face="Verdana" style="font-size: 14px;" class=""><br class=""></font></div>The counter-examples seem to me still to be overwhelming.</font><div class=""><font face="Verdana" style="font-size: 14px;" class="">I have found the following: </font></div><div class=""><font face="Verdana" style="font-size: 14px;" class=""><br class=""></font></div><div class=""><font face="Verdana" style="font-size: 14px;" class="">war an x 147</font></div><div class=""><font face="Verdana" style="font-size: 14px;" class="">waran x 1</font></div><div class=""><font face="Verdana" style="font-size: 14px;" class="">var an x 10</font></div><div class=""><font face="Verdana" style="font-size: 14px;" class="">vor an x 3</font></div><div class=""><font face="Verdana" style="font-size: 14px;" class="">wor an x 8</font></div><div class=""><font face="Verdana" style="font-size: 14px;" class=""><br class=""></font></div><div class=""><font face="Verdana" style="font-size: 14px;" class="">and Lhuyd writes uar an x 10.</font></div><div class=""><font face="Verdana" style="font-size: 14px;" class=""><br class=""></font></div><div class=""><font face="Verdana" style="font-size: 14px;" class="">The scribes of both Middle and Late Cornish seem to have believed the collocation</font></div><div class=""><font face="Verdana" style="font-size: 14px;" class="">of war + an to contain two syllables.</font></div><div class=""><span style="font-size: 14px; font-family: Verdana;" class="">I think I shall continue for the present to consider war’n less authentic than war an (wŕr an in KS).</span></div><div class=""><font face="Verdana" style="font-size: 14px;" class=""><br class=""></font></div><div class=""><font face="Verdana" style="font-size: 14px;" class="">Nicholas</font><br class=""><div class=""><br class=""></div><div class=""><br class=""><div class=""><blockquote type="cite" class=""><div class="">On 22 Feb 2016, at 20:59, Michael Everson <<a href="mailto:everson@evertype.com" class="">everson@evertype.com</a>> wrote:</div><br class="Apple-interchange-newline"><div class=""><span style="font-family: Helvetica; font-size: 12px; font-style: normal; font-variant: normal; font-weight: normal; letter-spacing: normal; orphans: auto; text-align: start; text-indent: 0px; text-transform: none; white-space: normal; widows: auto; word-spacing: 0px; -webkit-text-stroke-width: 0px; float: none; display: inline !important;" class="">Elided for verse? "war ’n ambos” is not exactly the same thing as a regular contraction to “war’n".<span class="Apple-converted-space"> </span></span><br style="font-family: Helvetica; font-size: 12px; font-style: normal; font-variant: normal; font-weight: normal; letter-spacing: normal; orphans: auto; text-align: start; text-indent: 0px; text-transform: none; white-space: normal; widows: auto; word-spacing: 0px; -webkit-text-stroke-width: 0px;" class=""></div></blockquote></div><br class=""></div></div></div>_______________________________________________<br class="">Spellyans mailing list<br class=""><a href="mailto:Spellyans@kernowek.net" class="">Spellyans@kernowek.net</a><br class=""><a href="http://kernowek.net/mailman/listinfo/spellyans_kernowek.net" class="">http://kernowek.net/mailman/listinfo/spellyans_kernowek.net</a><br class=""></blockquote></div><br class=""></div></div>_______________________________________________<br class="">Spellyans mailing list<br class=""><a href="mailto:Spellyans@kernowek.net" class="">Spellyans@kernowek.net</a><br class="">http://kernowek.net/mailman/listinfo/spellyans_kernowek.net<br class=""></div></blockquote></div><br class=""></div></body></html>