<div dir="ltr"><div><div>Thank you Olive...I am getting so many good interpretations of "win," but I need a Cornish Dictionary and some tapes to hear the proper pronunciation. My next question is: who would leed me to these Cornish language tools?<br></div>Sincerely;<br><br></div>Vincent D. Cornish BSSP/HD<br></div><div class="gmail_extra"><br><div class="gmail_quote">On Wed, Jun 22, 2016 at 1:18 AM, Clive Baker <span dir="ltr"><<a href="mailto:clive.baker@gmail.com" target="_blank">clive.baker@gmail.com</a>></span> wrote:<br><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex"><div dir="ltr">As also with place names like Coswinsawsen, near Camborne, meaning the fair wood of the saxon... here 'fair' must mean productive...a fair return...<div>However Nicholas shows that in the case in question it must mean 'white' quite clearly.</div><div>kemereugh wyth</div><span class="HOEnZb"><font color="#888888"><div>Clive</div></font></span></div><div class="HOEnZb"><div class="h5"><div class="gmail_extra"><br><div class="gmail_quote">On Tue, Jun 21, 2016 at 7:21 PM, Craig Weatherhill <span dir="ltr"><<a href="mailto:craig@agantavas.org" target="_blank">craig@agantavas.org</a>></span> wrote:<br><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex"><div style="word-wrap:break-word">The surname Angwin can only mean "the fair-haired/complexioned man", as the definite article cannot be used to precede an adjective, unless it's an adjectival noun.<div>Therefore:  Porthangwin, St Just (now Porth Nanven) must be "Angwin's cove".  Still a common surname in St Just parish, it is still pron. 'an'GWIN'<br><div><br></div><div>Angell is probably "the brown/tawny-haired man".  (This is usually pron. as Eng. 'angel', but should be 'an-GELL' (hard G).</div><div><br></div><div>Craig</div><div><br></div><div><br></div><div><br><div><div>On 2016 Efn 21, at 12:01, Eddie Climo wrote:</div><br><blockquote type="cite"><div style="word-wrap:break-word"><div>Good point, Jon. I think you’re probably right. In Cornish, ‘gwyn’ has well-known non-colour meanings such as (Nance, 1938):</div><div><br></div><div><b>gwyn.<span style="white-space:pre-wrap">  </span></b>pale-faced, fair, pleasant, splendid; </div><div><span style="white-space:pre-wrap">                </span>grand- Iin names of relationship);</div><div><span style="white-space:pre-wrap">               </span>holy, blessed/</div><div><br></div><div>Interesting, similarly extended meanings are found in other Celtic languages with their words for ‘white’, both with cognates such as:</div><div><br></div><div>Welsh: <b>gwyn</b>. white, pale, light, shining, bright, brilliant, holy, blessed, neatific, good, happy, splendid excellent etc.<i> (<Geiriadur Prifysgol Cymru)</i></div><div><br></div><div>Scots Gaelic: <b>fionn</b>. white, fair, pale; sincete, true, certain; small; fine, pleasant; pale, wan; lilac; degree of cold; resplendent, bright; known; prudent (Dwelly, <i>Faclair Gàidhlig gu Beurla)</i></div><div><br></div><div>…and the non-cognate, as in:</div><div>Irish Gaelic: <b>geal</b>.  white, bright, translucent; silvery; fair, good; dear, beloved; happy (Dinneen. <i>Foclóir Gaedhilge agus Béarla)</i></div><div><br></div><div>Eddie Climo</div><span><div><br></div><br><div><blockquote type="cite"><div>On 2016 Efn 21, at 08:51, Jon Mills <<a href="mailto:j.mills@email.com" target="_blank">j.mills@email.com</a>> wrote:</div><br><div><div><div style="font-family:Verdana;font-size:12.0px"><div>Do you think that 'gwydn' refers to colour in these attestations. It seems to me that 'gwydn' refers in these instances to 'virtue/goodness'. The English idiom 'as pure as the driven snow' (= morally unsullied, chaste) springs to mind.</div>

<div>Ol an gwella,</div>

<div>Jon</div></div></div></div></blockquote></div></span></div>_______________________________________________<span><br>Spellyans mailing list<br><a href="mailto:Spellyans@kernowek.net" target="_blank">Spellyans@kernowek.net</a><br><a href="http://kernowek.net/mailman/listinfo/spellyans_kernowek.net" target="_blank">http://kernowek.net/mailman/listinfo/spellyans_kernowek.net</a><br></span></blockquote></div><br></div></div></div><br>_______________________________________________<br>
Spellyans mailing list<br>
<a href="mailto:Spellyans@kernowek.net" target="_blank">Spellyans@kernowek.net</a><br>
<a href="http://kernowek.net/mailman/listinfo/spellyans_kernowek.net" rel="noreferrer" target="_blank">http://kernowek.net/mailman/listinfo/spellyans_kernowek.net</a><br>
<br></blockquote></div><br></div>
</div></div><br>_______________________________________________<br>
Spellyans mailing list<br>
<a href="mailto:Spellyans@kernowek.net">Spellyans@kernowek.net</a><br>
<a href="http://kernowek.net/mailman/listinfo/spellyans_kernowek.net" rel="noreferrer" target="_blank">http://kernowek.net/mailman/listinfo/spellyans_kernowek.net</a><br>
<br></blockquote></div><br></div>