<html><head><meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html charset=utf-8"></head><body style="word-wrap: break-word; -webkit-nbsp-mode: space; -webkit-line-break: after-white-space;" class=""><font face="Verdana" style="font-size: 14px;" class="">In spoken revived Cornish the default word for ‘and’ seems to be <u class="">hag</u>. On Radyo an Gernewegva, for example, speakers seem to use <u class="">hag</u> to join words and clauses rather than <u class="">ha</u> irrespective of whether a vowel follows or not. In traditional Cornish, however, <u class="">ha</u> is commonly used not only before consonants but also before vowels as well. I have listed a few examples from the texts in <i class="">Geryow Gwir.</i> The examples are found in </font><span style="font-size: 14px; font-family: Verdana;" class="">the earliest texts, e.g. <u class="">ha ynno</u> PA 233a, <u class="">ha y ny wozyens</u> PA 254c, <u class="">ha yn dour</u> OM 2790,<u class=""> ha ene </u>RD 1267, <u class="">ha a vo lel vygythys</u> RD 1143. Tregear writes <u class="">Adam ha Eva</u> TH 3, <u class="">adam ha eve</u> TH 4 and in JCH one finds <u class="">ha ev a uelaz golou</u> §26 and <u class="">Ha ev a dhêth a mes arta</u> §41.</span><div class=""><font face="Verdana" class=""><span style="font-size: 14px;" class=""><br class=""></span></font></div><div class=""><font face="Verdana" class=""><span style="font-size: 14px;" class=""><u class="">ha ow</u> where <u class="">ow</u> is the preverbal particle is attested 13 times in TH and SA whereas <u class="">hag ow</u> is attested twice only in TH and not at all in SA.</span></font></div><div class=""><font face="Verdana" class=""><span style="font-size: 14px;" class=""><br class=""></span></font></div><div class=""><div class=""><div class=""><span style="font-family: Verdana; font-size: 14px;" class="">In Sacrament an Alter </span><u style="font-family: Verdana; font-size: 14px;" class="">ha eva</u><span style="font-family: Verdana; font-size: 14px;" class=""> ‘and to drink’ occurs twice. Sacrament an Alter even writes <u class="">hef</u> for ‘and he’: <u class="">mas Dew ascendias then neff, hef asas vmma e kig theny</u> ‘God ascended into heaven, and he left his flesh here for us’ SA 60. </span></div><div class=""><font face="Verdana" class=""><span style="font-size: 14px;" class=""><br class=""></span></font></div><div class=""><font face="Verdana" class=""><span style="font-size: 14px;" class="">What does this mean? Is the rule that <u class="">hag</u> precedes a vowel invalid? Are <u class="">ha</u> and <u class="">hag</u> before vowels in free variation? Should learners be encouraged to use <u class="">ha</u> before vowels?</span></font></div><div class=""><div class=""><br class=""></div><div class=""><font face="Verdana" style="font-size: 14px;" class="">Nicholas</font></div><div class=""><br class=""></div></div></div></div></body></html>