<html><head><meta http-equiv="content-type" content="text/html; charset=utf-8"></head><body dir="auto"><div>I agree, Clive. Nance has a lengthy entry about this under 'ha(g)' in his '38 <i>Dictionary, </i>as well as in Appx.IV. He offers ha'n for 'hag an', as you say, but also combinations with the possessive adjs.: ha'm, ha'w, ha'th, ha'y, ha'gan, ha'gas, ha'ga.</div><div><br></div><div>Also h'a for 'hag a', ha'y for 'ha a'y', ha'w for 'hag ow-<verb noun>'.</div><div><br></div><div>The lengthy entry is well worth reading, as it offers some fine idioms that I didn't know, and Mordon Nance provides many of them with citations from the historical corpus—a courtesy offered by the better lexicographers of Cornish, such as Neil Kennedy, Richard Gendall, Fred Jago and Williams, Rev. Robert.</div><div><br><div><br>H. F. Climo</div><div id="AppleMailSignature"><br></div>On 1 Jul 2016, at 10:15, Clive Baker <<a href="mailto:clive.baker@gmail.com">clive.baker@gmail.com</a>> wrote:<br><br></div><blockquote type="cite"><div><div dir="ltr">The problem seems more that for almost the last 100 years, the rule has been 'ha' before consonants and 'hag' before vowels' with the one exception of 'ha+ an' which is 'ha'n'.<div>to try and change it now, whether right or wrong seems to me very difficult for such a tiny change....this from a teacher of the lingo</div><div>Clive</div></div></div></blockquote></body></html>