<div dir="ltr">In support of that, when I was first learning Cornish,(it seems millennia ago now) I was fortunate to possess both the 1934 and 1952 editions of Nance's dictionary, and I queried that very same question of my then great tutor, and now unfortunately deceased Leonard Orm...his reply was that Nance must have discovered something new in the meantime.<div>We now know that to be wrong of course, and I must agree with Nicholas.</div><div>Clive</div></div><div class="gmail_extra"><br><div class="gmail_quote">On Mon, Jul 4, 2016 at 3:03 PM, Nicholas Williams <span dir="ltr"><<a href="mailto:njawilliams@gmail.com" target="_blank">njawilliams@gmail.com</a>></span> wrote:<br><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex"><div style="word-wrap:break-word"><font face="Verdana" style="font-size:14px">I have been criticised for calling Ireland <u>Wordhen</u> in Cornish, since Nance’s 1952 gives *<u>Ywerdhon</u> only.</font><div><font face="Verdana" style="font-size:14px">The only attested forms are <u>Worthen</u> in Tonkin and <u>Uordhyn</u> in Lhuyd.<br></font><div><font face="Verdana" style="font-size:14px"><br></font><div><font face="Verdana" style="font-size:14px">Under Ireland in his 1938 Cornish-English dictionary Nance gives <u>Ywerdhon</u>, Wordhen and he says ’the y is obscure </font><span style="font-size:14px;font-family:Verdana">but need not be lost’. What exactly does that mean? Nance had no evidence at all for initial y in this name in Cornish at any period. The rounding of the stressed e > o suggests that the Cornish name was phonetically not as close to Welsh <u>Iwerddon</u> as Nance wished.</span></div><div><font face="Verdana" style="font-size:14px"><br></font></div><div><font face="Verdana" style="font-size:14px">In his first English-Cornish dictionary, however, under Ireland Nance gives <u>Wordhen</u> only.  </font></div></div><div><font face="Verdana" style="font-size:14px"><br></font></div><div><font face="Verdana" style="font-size:14px">It seems that between I934 and 1952 Nance’s Celtic purism increased.</font></div></div><span class="HOEnZb"><font color="#888888"><div><br></div><div><font face="Verdana" style="font-size:14px"><br></font></div><div><font face="Verdana" style="font-size:14px">Nicholas</font></div><div><br></div><div><br></div></font></span></div><br>_______________________________________________<br>
Spellyans mailing list<br>
<a href="mailto:Spellyans@kernowek.net">Spellyans@kernowek.net</a><br>
<a href="http://kernowek.net/mailman/listinfo/spellyans_kernowek.net" rel="noreferrer" target="_blank">http://kernowek.net/mailman/listinfo/spellyans_kernowek.net</a><br>
<br></blockquote></div><br></div>