<html><head><meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html charset=utf-8"></head><body style="word-wrap: break-word; -webkit-nbsp-mode: space; -webkit-line-break: after-white-space;" class=""><font face="Verdana" style="font-size: 14px;" class="">In his 1951 dictionary under ‘evergreen’ Nance suggests the neologism *<u class="">bythwer</u>.</font><div class=""><font face="Verdana" style="font-size: 14px;" class=""><br class=""></font></div><div class=""><font face="Verdana" style="font-size: 14px;" class="">More recently it has been claimed that *<u class="">bythwer</u> should really be *<u class="">bythlas</u>, since <u class="">gwer</u></font></div><div class=""><font face="Verdana" style="font-size: 14px;" class="">refers to "inanimate" green. </font></div><div class=""><font face="Verdana" style="font-size: 14px;" class=""><br class=""></font></div><div class=""><font face="Verdana" style="font-size: 14px;" class="">I wonder whether this criticism is valid.</font></div><div class=""><font face="Verdana" style="font-size: 14px;" class=""><br class=""></font></div><div class=""><font face="Verdana" class=""><span style="font-size: 14px;" class="">In Cornish </span><u style="font-size: 14px;" class="">gwer</u><span style="font-size: 14px;" class=""> certainly seems to refer to growing things and is not therefore simply an adjective for “inanimate green".</span></font></div><div class=""><font face="Verdana" style="font-size: 14px;" class=""><br class=""></font></div><div class=""><font face="Verdana" style="font-size: 14px;" class="">Lhuyd gives: </font></div><div class=""><font face="Verdana" style="font-size: 14px;" class=""><br class=""></font></div><div class=""><div style="margin: 0px; line-height: normal;" class=""><font face="Verdana" style="font-size: 14px;" class=""><u class="">Kẏ guêr vel an guelz</u> [maga gwer avell an gwels] ‘as green as grass’ AB: 248c.</font></div></div><div style="margin: 0px; line-height: normal;" class=""><font face="Verdana" style="font-size: 14px;" class=""><br class=""></font></div><div style="margin: 0px; line-height: normal;" class=""><font face="Verdana" style="font-size: 14px;" class="">He also cites:</font></div><div style="margin: 0px; line-height: normal;" class=""><font face="Verdana" style="font-size: 14px;" class=""><br class=""></font></div><div style="margin: 0px; line-height: normal;" class=""><font face="Verdana" style="font-size: 14px;" class=""><u class="">delkio guêr</u> s.v. Frons ‘a green bough with leaves’ AB: 61c.</font></div><div style="margin: 0px; line-height: normal;" class=""><font face="Verdana" style="font-size: 14px;" class=""><br class=""></font></div><div style="margin: 0px; line-height: normal;" class=""><font face="Verdana" style="font-size: 14px;" class="">Under Pascuum ‘Feeding ground, pasturage’ he gives <u class="">Gueruelz</u> AB: 113c, where <u class="">gueruelz</u> [gwerwels]</font></div><div style="margin: 0px; line-height: normal;" class=""><font face="Verdana" style="font-size: 14px;" class="">is clearly a compound of <u class="">gwer</u> ‘green’ and <u class="">gwels</u> ‘grass’.</font></div><div style="margin: 0px; line-height: normal;" class=""><font face="Verdana" style="font-size: 14px;" class=""><br class=""></font></div><div style="margin: 0px; line-height: normal;" class=""><font face="Verdana" style="font-size: 14px;" class=""><u class="">Gwer</u> in Lhuyd’s day was clearly the ordinary word for ‘green’ when referring to leaves and grass.</font></div><div style="margin: 0px; line-height: normal;" class=""><font face="Verdana" style="font-size: 14px;" class=""><br class=""></font></div><div style="margin: 0px; line-height: normal;" class=""><font face="Verdana" style="font-size: 14px;" class="">For Lhuyd on the other hand <u class="">glas</u> meant ‘grey’:</font></div><div style="margin: 0px; line-height: normal;" class=""><font face="Verdana" style="font-size: 14px;" class=""><br class=""></font></div><div style="margin: 0px; line-height: normal;" class=""><font face="Verdana" style="font-size: 14px;" class=""><u class="">Blêu glâz</u> ‘gray [sic] hairs’ AB: 3a; W Glâs, Gray, C[ornish[ <u class="">Glâz</u> AB: 30b; Cinereus ‘Ash-coloured’ C[ornish] <u class="">Glâs</u> AB: 47c-48a.</font></div><div class=""><font face="Verdana" style="font-size: 14px;" class=""><br class=""></font></div><div class=""><font face="Verdana" style="font-size: 14px;" class="">It seems therefore that Nance’s <u class="">bythwer</u> ’evergreen’ is perfectly permissible and indeed preferable to *<u class="">bythlas</u>.</font></div><div class=""><font face="Verdana" style="font-size: 14px;" class=""><br class=""></font></div><div class=""><font face="Verdana" style="font-size: 14px;" class="">Nicholas</font></div></body></html>