<html><body style="word-wrap: break-word; -webkit-nbsp-mode: space; -webkit-line-break: after-white-space;" class=""><div style="margin: 0px; text-align: justify; font-size: 13px; line-height: normal; -webkit-text-stroke-color: rgb(0, 0, 0); -webkit-text-stroke-width: initial;" class=""><span style="font-kerning: none" class="">I have just seen something in Lhuyd’s manuscript vocabulary which appears to have gone unnoticed hitherto.</span></div><div style="margin: 0px; text-align: justify; font-size: 13px; line-height: normal; -webkit-text-stroke-color: rgb(0, 0, 0); -webkit-text-stroke-width: initial; min-height: 16px;" class=""><span style="font-kerning: none" class=""></span><br class=""></div><div style="margin: 0px; text-align: justify; font-size: 13px; line-height: normal; -webkit-text-stroke-color: rgb(0, 0, 0); -webkit-text-stroke-width: initial;" class=""><span style="font-kerning: none" class="">On page 97 of his manuscript Lhuyd writes:</span></div><div style="margin: 0px; text-align: justify; font-size: 13px; line-height: normal; -webkit-text-stroke-color: rgb(0, 0, 0); -webkit-text-stroke-width: initial; min-height: 16px;" class=""><span style="font-kerning: none" class=""></span><br class=""></div><div style="margin: 0px; text-align: justify; font-size: 13px; line-height: normal; -webkit-text-stroke-color: rgb(0, 0, 0); -webkit-text-stroke-width: initial;" class=""><span style="text-decoration: underline ; font-kerning: none" class="">Leveldhzia</span><span style="font-kerning: none" class=""> y vrêch gôch Rubiola</span></div><div style="margin: 0px; text-align: justify; font-size: 13px; line-height: normal; -webkit-text-stroke-color: rgb(0, 0, 0); -webkit-text-stroke-width: initial; min-height: 16px;" class=""><span style="font-kerning: none" class=""></span><br class=""></div><div style="margin: 0px; text-align: justify; font-size: 13px; line-height: normal; -webkit-text-stroke-color: rgb(0, 0, 0); -webkit-text-stroke-width: initial;" class=""><span style="font-kerning: none" class="">From the Welsh and Latin glosses of the word it is clear that Lhuyd’s </span><span style="text-decoration: underline ; font-kerning: none" class="">Leveldhzia</span><span style="font-kerning: none" class=""> means ‘measles’ —<i class="">Rubiola</i> in Latin and <i class="">y frech goch</i> in Welsh. The group -<i class="">ldhz</i>- I take to be an error for -<i class="">ldzh</i>-. If so, the Cornish form in Middle Cornish orthography would be *<i class="">levelgya</i>. This I take to be a variant of <i class="">lovrygyan</i> ‘leprosy’ seen in BM:</span></div><div style="margin: 0px; text-align: justify; font-size: 13px; line-height: normal; -webkit-text-stroke-color: rgb(0, 0, 0); -webkit-text-stroke-width: initial; min-height: 16px;" class=""><span style="font-kerning: none" class=""></span><br class=""></div><div style="margin: 0px; text-align: justify; font-size: 13px; line-height: normal; -webkit-text-stroke-color: rgb(0, 0, 0); -webkit-text-stroke-width: initial;" class=""><span style="font-kerning: none" class=""><i class="">yma ortheff </i><b class=""><i class="">lovrygyan</i></b><i class=""> cothys ha ny won fetla</i> ‘leprosy has come upon me and I don’t know how’ BM 1356-57.</span></div><div style="margin: 0px; text-align: justify; font-size: 13px; line-height: normal; -webkit-text-stroke-color: rgb(0, 0, 0); -webkit-text-stroke-width: initial; min-height: 16px;" class=""><span style="font-kerning: none" class=""></span><br class=""></div><div style="margin: 0px; text-align: justify; font-size: 13px; line-height: normal; -webkit-text-stroke-color: rgb(0, 0, 0); -webkit-text-stroke-width: initial;" class=""><span style="font-kerning: none" class="">*<i class="">Leveljya</i> is clearly a spoken form which Lhuyd heard in Cornwall. The development was presumably <i class="">lovryjyan</i> > *<i class="">lovyrjyan</i> > <i class="">lovyljyan</i> with metathesis and where the <i class="">r</i> has been assimilated to the initial segment /l/. The first syllable, being unstressed, was pronounced with schwa, which Lhuyd writes as <e>. The loss of the final <i class="">n</i> is also not astonishing. The word, a collective plural (like <i class="">measles</i>, <i class="">pox</i> < <i class="">pocks</i>) has by analogy been reshaped as the name of a disease in the singular, and so similar to English terms like <i class="">odontalgia</i> ‘toothache’ and <i class="">cephalalgia</i> ‘headache’ known in Lhuyd’s day. As for the sense, it should be noted that in Welsh <i class="">brech</i>, <i class="">y frech</i> with or without further epithet is used for smallpox, syphilis, measles and leprosy. The apparent difference in sense between <i class="">lovrygyan</i> ‘leprosy’ and *<i class="">lovyljya</i>/<i class="">leveljya</i> ‘measles’ should not astonish us.</span></div><div style="margin: 0px; text-align: justify; font-size: 13px; line-height: normal; -webkit-text-stroke-color: rgb(0, 0, 0); -webkit-text-stroke-width: initial; min-height: 16px;" class=""><span style="font-kerning: none" class=""></span><br class=""></div><div style="margin: 0px; text-align: justify; font-size: 13px; line-height: normal; -webkit-text-stroke-color: rgb(0, 0, 0); -webkit-text-stroke-width: initial;" class=""><span style="font-kerning: none" class="">Whether we can use <i class="">lovryjyon</i> to mean ‘leprosy’ and <i class="">leveljya</i> for ‘measles’ is another question.</span></div><div style="margin: 0px; text-align: justify; font-size: 13px; line-height: normal; -webkit-text-stroke-color: rgb(0, 0, 0); -webkit-text-stroke-width: initial; min-height: 16px;" class=""><span style="font-kerning: none" class=""></span><br class=""></div><div style="margin: 0px; text-align: justify; font-size: 13px; line-height: normal; -webkit-text-stroke-color: rgb(0, 0, 0); -webkit-text-stroke-width: initial;" class=""><span style="font-kerning: none" class="">Nicholas</span></div></body></html>