<html><head><meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html charset=utf-8"></head><body style="word-wrap: break-word; -webkit-nbsp-mode: space; -webkit-line-break: after-white-space;" class=""><div class=""><font size="4" class=""><span class="Apple-tab-span" style="white-space:pre">       </span>I agree wholeheartedly with Neil My objection to the use of the suffix *-<i class="">el</i> is not that it is a bound</font></div><div class=""><font size="4" class="">morpheme, but that it is so very rare. I assume that -<i class="">el</i> is to be identified with -<i class="">yl</i>, which as far as I</font></div><div class=""><font size="4" class="">am aware is attested only in <i class="">skentyl</i> PA 9a, etc. It might seem curious that -<i class="">ol</i> is so common in</font></div><div class=""><font size="4" class="">Welsh and -<i class="">el</i> in Breton, but is extremely rare indeed in Cornish. The reason, I believe, is fairly obvious.</font></div><div class=""><font size="4" class="">In the Old Cornish period, long before OCV was written, the -<i class="">l</i> in the suffix -<i class="">ol</i> > -<i class="">yl</i> had the effect of</font></div><div class=""><font size="4" class="">strengthening a following lenis consonant to a fortis. Such consonants were as a result of </font></div><div class=""><font size="4" class="">the strengthening not susceptible to assibilation. It is for this reason we find: <i class="">skyans</i> PA 1c and <i class="">skyansek</i> BM 377</font></div><div class=""><font size="4" class="">but <i class="">skentyl</i> and <i class="">skyantoleth</i> TH 6a. The same blocking of the assibilation of -<i class="">nt</i>- before following <i class="">l </i>can be seen in</font></div><div class=""><font size="4" class=""><i class="">antell</i> PA 19a, <i class="">kantyll</i> TH 17a and <i class="">kuntel</i> BM 1508. Following <i class="">l </i>also appears to block the assibilation of</font></div><div class=""><font size="4" class="">preceding -<i class="">d</i>- in <i class="">Nadelik</i> Gwavas, <i class="">padal</i> BK 1132 and <i class="">scudel</i> PA 43c. Moreover folllowing <i class="">l</i> seems to strengthen</font></div><div class=""><font size="4" class=""><i class="">g > k</i>, for example in <i class="">drog</i> but <i class="">drockoleth </i>TH 5.</font></div><div class=""><font size="4" class=""><span class="Apple-tab-span" style="white-space:pre">        </span>We can assume, I think, that Cornish speakers were wary of using the suffix -<i class="">ol</i> > <i class="">yl</i>/*-<i class="">el </i>precisely because it</font></div><div class=""><font size="4" class="">seemed to obscure the relationship between the simplex and the derived adjective, since the first would in so many</font></div><div class=""><font size="4" class="">cases be assibilated but the second would not. As a result they used -<i class="">ek</i>,-<i class="">ak</i> and -<i class="">us </i></font><span style="font-size: large;" class="">instead. </span></div><div class=""><font size="4" class=""><span class="Apple-tab-span" style="white-space:pre">  </span>There are apparent exceptions to the blocking effect of following <i class="">l </i>on assibilation of the cluster -<i class="">nt</i>. The form</font></div><div class=""><font size="4" class=""><i class="">sansoleth</i> occurs at BM 137, etc. We must assume that the suffix -<i class="">oleth</i> was added to <i class="">sans</i> after assibilation had occurred.</font></div><div class=""><font size="4" class="">It is interesting that there is no example of *<i class="">sansyl</i> or *<i class="">santyl</i> (Breton <i class="">santel</i>), however. Similarly, in spite of</font></div><div class=""><font size="4" class=""><i class="">drockoleth</i> we have no example of *<i class="">drockyl</i>.</font></div><div class=""><font size="4" class=""><span class="Apple-tab-span" style="white-space:pre">        </span>We must also assume that the suffix -<i class="">yl/el</i> > -<i class="">al</i> was added to <i class="">gwyns</i> ‘wind’ after assibilation to give <i class="">guinzal</i>.</font></div><div class=""><font size="4" class="">It must also be admitted that names of tools in -<i class="">el</i>, -<i class="">al</i> are not common. As far as I am aware <i class="">guinzal</i> AB 60a is the only </font></div><div class=""><font size="4" class="">example. Again this is probably the result of reluctance to use as a productive suffix a morpheme that could</font></div><div class=""><font size="4" class="">disturb the surface shape of related words.</font></div><div class=""><font size="4" class=""><span class="Apple-tab-span" style="white-space:pre">       </span>It also seems that the other sonants <i class="">r</i> and <i class="">n</i> could block assibilation. Thus we have <i class="">hus</i> ‘magic’ but <i class="">huder</i> ‘magician’</font></div><div class=""><font size="4" class="">and the pair <i class="">gweder</i> < <i class="">uitrum</i> but <i class="">gwrys</i> < the metathesised form *<i class="">writum</i>, where there was no following <i class="">r</i>. Similarly we find </font></div><div class=""><font size="4" class=""><i class="">fenten</i> and <i class="">gwaynten</i> where a following <i class="">n</i> appears to have strengthened preceding -<i class="">nt</i>- and thus prevented its being assibilated.</font></div><div class=""><font size="4" class=""><span class="Apple-tab-span" style="white-space:pre">   </span>Examples of -<i class="">yel</i> are not relevant here since the -<i class="">el</i> follows a vowel and thus could not block assibilation. There was therefore </font><span style="font-size: large;" class="">no reason not to use it in toponyms.</span></div><div class=""><font size="4" class=""><span class="Apple-tab-span" style="white-space:pre">      </span>I have discussed the whole question of assibilation and its being blocked in my recent book: <i class="">The Cornish Consonantal</i></font></div><div class=""><font size="4" class=""><i class="">System</i>. </font></div><div class=""><font size="4" class=""><span class="Apple-tab-span" style="white-space:pre">     </span>Finally I repeat my original observation. Native Cornish speakers were reluctant to use the suffix -yl/*-el for a perfectly</font></div><div class=""><font size="4" class="">good reason. If we want the revived language to resemble the traditional Celtic speech of Cornwall, we too should eschew adjectival *-el.</font></div><div class=""><font size="4" class=""><br class=""></font></div><div class=""><font size="4" class="">Nicholas</font></div><div class=""><span class="Apple-tab-span" style="white-space:pre"> </span></div><div class=""><font size="4" class=""><br class=""></font></div></body></html>