<html>
<head>
<meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=utf-8">
</head>
<body bgcolor="#FFFFFF" text="#000000">
Sorry for starting the discussion and then not replying very much last night (bleddy sheep!)
<br>
 <br>
<br>
Harry Hawkey wrote: <br>
<blockquote>However, Lhuyd's AB has (at least) 5 attestations of 'yn wir'[...] <br>
In one of these, Lhuyd quite clearly specifies that this is the adverbial particle rather than the preposition 
<br>
(in the section entitled 'Of the Adverb and Interjection’. <br>
<br>
</blockquote>
Michael Everson wrote: <br>
<blockquote>Well, in 248b he refers to this particle in a paragraph where he gives "en fìr", "en ſplan", “en ’lannith”, “en lûan”. 
<br>
Two paragraphs later in 248c he gives “en ụir” and “en dhiùᵹel” neither of which have the mixed mutation.
<br>
</blockquote>
 <br>
Harry Hawkey wrote: <br>
<blockquote>Not quite sure what you mean[. ..]<br>
</blockquote>
<blockquote>***Please explain*** <br>
</blockquote>
 <br>
Seriously, am I just being dim here? I fail to see the relevance of your examples. "en fìr" has no mutation. "en ſplan" has no mutation.
<br>
“en ’lanni[t?]h” is lenited. “En lûan” is not mutated. “en ụir” and “en dhiùᵹel” are both lenited.
<br>
<br>
Why would any of these examples show mixed mutation,  since Late....I mean 'Late'...I mean 17th century and later....Cornish appears to have (usually) replaced the mixed mutation with lenition?
<br>
 <br>
What exactly is your point? Or shall I just keep guessing? <span class="moz-smiley-s1">
<span>:-)</span></span><br>
(The smiley is so that my confusion is not mistaken for aggression...) <br>
 <br>
 <br>
 <br>
Michael Everson wrote: <br>
<br>
<blockquote>I don’t know whether Lhuyd could distinguish what we write as “in” vs what we write as “yn” or not.
<br>
 <br>
</blockquote>
I think, reading AB pg 248 and pg 249 chapter IX 'Of the Preposition" implies that he understood the difference.
<br>
But I don't know either. <br>
 <br>
 <br>
 <br>
Harry Hawkey wrote: <br>
<br>
<blockquote>......late Cornish....... <br>
<br>
</blockquote>
Michael Everson wrote: <br>
 <br>
<blockquote>I don’t usually consider “Late Cornish” to be a different language.  <br>
</blockquote>
 <br>
Me neither. I do find it a useful fiction, however, as well as a quick way of writing  "the Cornish language from sometime in the early 1600s to roughly 1800". 
<br>
Indeed, it seems Nicholas Williams agrees with me: <br>
<br>
 <br>
Nicholas Williams wrote: <br>
 <br>
<blockquote>It is common in <b><i>Late Cornish</i></b> to use lenition where mixed mutation would have been expected
<br>
in Middle Cornish. <br>
<br>
</blockquote>
We could perhaps start a new topic for this: 'Middle and late Cornish - different languages or dialect continuum?'. 
<br>
I suppose I did bring this on myself by welcoming pedantic corrections... <br>
 <br>
 <br>
Michael Everson wrote: <br>
<br>
<blockquote>There are “late" features found in Pascon agan Arluth. <br>
<br>
</blockquote>
Indeed, depending on what you define as a 'Late' feature. But can you find any examples of mixed mutation being replaced by lenitions in PAA? 
<br>
I couldn't find any. <br>
 <br>
<br>
Nicholas Williams wrote: <br>
<br>
<blockquote>There seem to be no examples of yn wh- from an adjective beginning with
<br>
gw- nor of yn h- from an adjective with radical g-. <br>
</blockquote>
 <br>
 <br>
I couldn't find any either. But PAA 232.3 has 'yn whas' (customarily? usually? Any suggestions?)
<br>
 <br>
 <br>
 <br>
Nicholas Williams wrote: <br>
<br>
<blockquote>Lhuyd’s en uîr is so well attested as not to be a mistake. <br>
</blockquote>
     <br>
Do you mean he heard it spoken in Cornwall and transcribed it correctly? <br>
 <br>
 <br>
Nicholas Williams wrote: <br>
 <br>
<blockquote>Lhuyd’s use of lenition after en is best explained as the extension of lenition probably by Lhuyd at the
<br>
expense of the mixed mutation. <br>
</blockquote>
 <br>
Erm...do you mean Lhuyd made it up himself, and did not hear it spoken in Cornwall? This appears to contradict what was written above...Or am
<br>
I being a bit slow again? <br>
 <br>
 <br>
Nicholas Williams wrote: <br>
 <br>
<blockquote>At all events it seems that inherited yn gwir looked like the particle yn + gwir 
<br>
to Lhuyd, and in consequence he mutated with lenition. <br>
</blockquote>
 <br>
Implies 'yn wir' is an invention of Lhuyds...? <br>
 <br>
<i>Do you think he actually heard it spoken, or do you think he invented it himself?</i><br>
<br>
 <br>
Nicholas Williams wrote: <br>
 <br>
<blockquote>gen hloh <br>
seith mbledhan <br>
ni hlew <br>
yn whedhan <br>
</blockquote>
 <br>
Yes, I'm pretty cautious of things that we only find attested in Lhuyd because of examples such as this, which is one of the
<br>
reasons I started the topic.  <br>
 <br>
 <br>
Dan Prohaska wrote: <br>
<br>
<blockquote>[...] this is what RLC speakers have been following, e.g. using ‹gwir› without the particle
<br>
</blockquote>
 <br>
This seems like probably the least controversial and most authentic approach for R'L'C.
<br>
<br>
<br>
<br>
 <br>
 <br>
<br>
</body>
</html>