<html><head><meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html charset=utf-8"></head><body style="word-wrap: break-word; -webkit-nbsp-mode: space; -webkit-line-break: after-white-space;" class="">Voiced ’s’ is rhotacized only if it is the reflex of earlier -d-. Voiced ’s’ from original ’s’ appears as <z><div class="">e.g. Thomas Boson’s preezyo ‘praise’.</div><div class=""><br class=""></div><div class="">Is the weak fricative ‘gh’ pronounced as ‘th’?. How do you explain er ‘snow’ AB: 99b for ergh?</div><div class="">For that matter how do you explain lowarth mamb ‘many mothers’ SA 59 for lowar mabm?</div><div class=""><br class=""></div><div class="">Jenner thought that Cornish r was indeed trilled for he says ‘Its full sound is trilled not guttural’.</div><div class="">By guttural one assumes he mean velar and was referring to the French r. </div><div class=""><br class=""></div><div class="">Medial r in Old Cornish was sonorous in that it strengthened a lenis d to fortis and thus</div><div class="">prevented assibilation. This can be seen from pedry, edrek, ladra, etc. </div><div class=""><br class=""></div><div class="">R also on occasion lowered a preceeding o > a, e.g. Par < Porth.</div><div class="">It also rounded i > y, eg. in spuris in TH. </div><div class=""><br class=""></div><div class="">Whether sarchya < serchya has occurred in Cornish or in English is impossible to say. </div><div class=""><br class=""></div><div class="">My own view is that we cannot say with any certainty how Cornish r was pronounced.</div><div class=""><br class=""></div><div class="">Nicholas</div><div class=""><br class=""></div><div class=""><br class=""></div><div class=""><div><blockquote type="cite" class=""><div class="">On 27 Mar 2017, at 13:51, Anthony Hearn <<a href="mailto:a.d.hearn@blueyonder.co.uk" class="">a.d.hearn@blueyonder.co.uk</a>> wrote:</div><br class="Apple-interchange-newline"><div class=""><p style="margin-bottom: 0.25cm; line-height: 16.799999237060547px; font-family: Verdana; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-variant-caps: normal; font-weight: normal; letter-spacing: normal; orphans: auto; text-align: start; text-indent: 0px; text-transform: none; white-space: normal; widows: auto; word-spacing: 0px; -webkit-text-stroke-width: 0px; background-color: rgb(255, 255, 255);" class=""><font face="Liberation Sans, sans-serif" class=""><font size="3" style="font-size: 12pt;" class="">1) the voiced 's' in 'esof' (etc.) was rhotacized.</font></font></p><p style="margin-bottom: 0.25cm; line-height: 16.799999237060547px; font-family: Verdana; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-variant-caps: normal; font-weight: normal; letter-spacing: normal; orphans: auto; text-align: start; text-indent: 0px; text-transform: none; white-space: normal; widows: auto; word-spacing: 0px; -webkit-text-stroke-width: 0px; background-color: rgb(255, 255, 255);" class=""><font face="Liberation Sans, sans-serif" class=""><font size="3" style="font-size: 12pt;" class="">2) the weak fricative ('gh') adjacent to 'r' tended to be expressed as 'th' ('marth' for 'margh' etc.)</font></font></p></div></blockquote></div><br class=""></div></body></html>