<html><head></head><body style="word-wrap: break-word; -webkit-nbsp-mode: space; -webkit-line-break: after-white-space; ">I'm certain that no traditional Cornish speaker ever pronounced R as Wella Brown does it.  I heard it at a Gorsedh one year and, frankly, cringed and wished I was elsewhere.  UC <rak> was pronounced by him as: r-r-r-r-r-r-rak!  It sounded like a trials bike revving up!<div><br></div><div>I used to get hay from a farmer, Ron Jelbert of Keigwin, Morvah, who had a wonderful West Penwith accent and, from him, I heard how <carn> should really be pronounced.</div><div>He did not pronounce the word to rhyme with "barn" or the increasing English version "bahn"</div><div>The A was as in "cat" but very slightly drawn-out, and the R was distinctly pronounced.</div><div><br></div><div>I have several CD recordings of the West Penwith accent, and often compare these to Lhuyd's phonetic code.  Richard Gendall carried out a study of Lhuyd and, from it, wrote his excellent "The Pronunciation of Cornish".</div><div>He was careful to consult a book whose title and author I can't now recall, without seeking out my copy of Gendall's study, but it it was a book that examined how English was pronounced over several centuries.</div><div>So, when Lhuyd writes "pronounced as English", he means English of c.1700, not of today, and Gendall catered for this.</div><div><br></div><div>In the end, Lhuyd is the only real guide we have to the pronunciation of Cornish, and his findings (as clarified by Gendall) influence my own pronunciation of the tongue.  You will also hear it the Cornish speech of Richard Gendall, Neil Kennedy and Dan Prohaska, and it SOUNDS Cornish.</div><div><br></div><div>I hear many modern speakers (naming no names at all), and what they are saying does not sound remotely like Cornish, but contrived, alien, and often rather English in fashion.</div><div>I can't help thinking of the English spy posing as a French policeman in "'Allo, 'Allo!" who mispronounces French terribly (but they do it in English, to hilarious effect -   " 'Allo!  I was jist pissing pest your deer."  (Hello, I was just passing by your door.)<br><div>  </div><div>Craig</div><div><br></div><div><br></div><div><br><div><div>On 2017 Mer 27, at 13:51, Anthony Hearn wrote:</div><br class="Apple-interchange-newline"><blockquote type="cite">
  
    <meta content="text/html; charset=UTF-8" http-equiv="Content-Type">
  
  <div bgcolor="#FFFFFF" text="#000000">
    <meta http-equiv="content-type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8">
    <meta http-equiv="content-type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8"><p> <font face="Liberation Sans, sans-serif"><font style="font-size: 12pt" size="3">I
          hesitate to venture in in where there are far more
          knowledgable folk
          than I, but nonetheless I hazard these thoughts:</font></font></p><p><font face="Liberation Sans, sans-serif"><font style="font-size:
          12pt" size="3">In
          Late Cornish:</font></font></p><p><font face="Liberation Sans, sans-serif"><font style="font-size:
          12pt" size="3">1)
          the voiced 's' in 'esof' (etc.) was rhotacized.</font></font></p><p><font face="Liberation Sans, sans-serif"><font style="font-size:
          12pt" size="3">2)
          the weak fricative ('gh') adjacent to 'r' tended to be
          expressed as
          'th' ('marth' for 'margh' etc.)</font></font></p><p><font face="Liberation Sans, sans-serif"><font style="font-size:
          12pt" size="3">I
          would argue that these progressions were highly unlikely were
          the 'r'
          being pronounced as the West English </font></font><font face="Liberation Sans, sans-serif"><font style="font-size: 12pt" size="3">alveolar
        </font></font><font face="Liberation Sans, sans-serif"><font style="font-size: 12pt" size="3">approximant
          [ɹ], in which the articulation pulls away from the teeth, than
          as a
          dental tap </font></font><font face="Liberation Sans,
        sans-serif"><font style="font-size: 12pt" size="3">[</font></font><span style="font-variant: normal"><font color="#000000"><span style="text-decoration: none"><font face="Liberation Sans,
              sans-serif"><font style="font-size: 12pt" size="3"><span style="letter-spacing: normal"><span style="font-style: normal"><span style="font-weight:
                      normal"><span style="background: #ffffff">ɾ</span></span></span></span></font></font></span></font></span><span style="font-variant: normal"><font color="#000000"><span style="text-decoration: none"><font face="Liberation Sans,
              sans-serif"><font style="font-size: 12pt" size="3"><span style="letter-spacing: normal"><span style="font-style: normal"><span style="font-weight:
                      normal"><span style="background: #ffffff">]
                        which is adjacent to both [z] and [θ].</span></span></span></span></font></font></span></font></span></p><p><font face="Liberation Sans, sans-serif"><font style="font-size:
          12pt" size="3"><span style="font-variant: normal"><font color="#000000"><span style="text-decoration: none"><span style="letter-spacing: normal"><span style="font-style: normal"><span style="font-weight:
                      normal"><span style="background: #ffffff">To
                        my ears it is the use among learners and
                        speakers of the West Country
                        English [ɹ] which makes so much spoken Cornish
                        sound less than
                        convincing. I think, too, that had Lhuyd heard
                        this sound he would
                        have mentioned it. In alluding to an occasional
                        aspirated
                        articulation, he is surely likening it more to
                        the Welsh predental than to
                        an English approximant.</span></span></span></span></span></font></span></font></font></p><p>Tony Hearn<br>
      <br>
    </p>
    <title></title>
    <meta name="generator" content="LibreOffice 5.1.6.2 (Linux)">
    <style type="text/css">
                @page { margin: 2cm }
                p { margin-bottom: 0.25cm; line-height: 120% }
                a:link { so-language: zxx }</style><p>
      <meta http-equiv="content-type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8">
    </p><p>
      <title></title>
      <meta name="generator" content="LibreOffice 5.1.6.2 (Linux)">
      <style type="text/css">
                @page { margin: 2cm }
                p { margin-bottom: 0.25cm; line-height: 120% }
                a:link { so-language: zxx }] which is close to both [z] and [  ] . One of the least convincing features of many contemporary speakers of Cornish is the very 'West Country' burred</style></p><p><br>
    </p><p>On 27/03/17 12:38, Harry Hawkey wrote:<br>
    </p>
    <blockquote cite="mid:MMXP123MB13125DAF321EA08A4FF18CEFCB330@MMXP123MB1312.GBRP123.PROD.OUTLOOK.COM" type="cite">
      <meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8">
      <div class="moz-cite-prefix">Here's some comments from Jackson,
        'Language and History in Early Britain', pg 477-478: (slightly
        edited, may contain OCR errors...)<br>
        <br>
        <blockquote>In Cornish...no distinctions in l and r were
          recognised in the orthography...there is some trace of a
          voiceless initial r- [...] as has been pointed out by Forster
          [...] where he quotes 
          <i>Hret Winiau</i> "the Ford of Winiau" ... in an
          AS[Anglo-Saxon] document of 969, and
          <i>Hryd</i> in one of 960   and <i>Hryt</i> in another of
          967, both in Cornwall.<br>
        </blockquote>
        <br>
        And here's what Lhuyd has to say (AB, pg 229)<br>
        <br>
        <blockquote>The Cornish very rarely asperate their Initial r,
          saying <i>Risk ha reden rydh</i> [Bark and red Fern]  and not
          as in Welsh
          <i>Rhîsk a rhedyn rhydh</i>; but they had this aspiration I
          suppose formerly, for I have frequently observ'd them to say
          Rhag [ For] as well as Rag.
          <br>
        </blockquote>
        <br>
        Also, there are various examples of internal 'rh' spellings in
        the texts which also seem to indicate devoicing.<br>
        <br>
        So, possibly a voiceless r sound  [r̥] (as in Welsh) existed as
        an allophone of the 'normal' voiced r [ɹ] in Cornish.<br>
        <br>
        <br>
        Perhaps an actual linguist will reply later and give a better
        analysis...<br>
        <br>
        <br>
        <br>
        On 27/03/17 09:06, G ROBERTS wrote:<br>
      </div>
      <blockquote cite="mid:155653793.5702092.1490601996872@mail.yahoo.com" type="cite">
        How would 'r' have been pronounced in traditional spoken
        Cornish?
        <div id="yMail_cursorElementTracker_1490601634577"><br>
        </div>
        <div id="yMail_cursorElementTracker_1490601636329">Are there any
          pointers to this?</div>
        <div id="yMail_cursorElementTracker_1490601651978"><br>
        </div>
        <div id="yMail_cursorElementTracker_1490601653837">Meur ras,</div>
        <div id="yMail_cursorElementTracker_1490601659319">Gorwel
          Roberts<br>
          <br>
          <div id="ymail_android_signature"><a moz-do-not-send="true" href="https://overview.mail.yahoo.com/mobile/?.src=Android">Sent
              from Yahoo Mail on Android</a></div>
          <br>
          <blockquote style="margin: 0 0 20px 0;">
            <header style="font-family:Roboto, sans-serif;
              color:#6D00F6;">
              <div>On Fri, 24 Mar 2017 at 18:16, Nicholas Williams</div>
              <div><a moz-do-not-send="true" class="moz-txt-link-rfc2396E" href="mailto:njawilliams@gmail.com"><njawilliams@gmail.com></a>
                wrote:</div>
            </header>
            <div style="padding: 10px 0 0 20px; margin: 10px 0 0 0;
              border-left: 1px solid #6D00F6;">
              _______________________________________________<br clear="none">
              Spellyans mailing list<br clear="none">
              <a moz-do-not-send="true" shape="rect" ymailto="mailto:Spellyans@kernowek.net" href="mailto:Spellyans@kernowek.net">Spellyans@kernowek.net</a><br clear="none">
              <a moz-do-not-send="true" shape="rect" href="http://kernowek.net/mailman/listinfo/spellyans_kernowek.net" target="_blank">http://kernowek.net/mailman/listinfo/spellyans_kernowek.net</a><br clear="none">
            </div>
          </blockquote>
        </div>
        <br>
        <fieldset class="mimeAttachmentHeader"></fieldset>
        <br>
        <pre wrap="">_______________________________________________
Spellyans mailing list
<a moz-do-not-send="true" class="moz-txt-link-abbreviated" href="mailto:Spellyans@kernowek.net">Spellyans@kernowek.net</a>
<a moz-do-not-send="true" class="moz-txt-link-freetext" href="http://kernowek.net/mailman/listinfo/spellyans_kernowek.net">http://kernowek.net/mailman/listinfo/spellyans_kernowek.net</a>
</pre>
      </blockquote><p><br>
      </p>
      <br>
      <fieldset class="mimeAttachmentHeader"></fieldset>
      <br>
      <pre wrap="">_______________________________________________
Spellyans mailing list
<a class="moz-txt-link-abbreviated" href="mailto:Spellyans@kernowek.net">Spellyans@kernowek.net</a>
<a class="moz-txt-link-freetext" href="http://kernowek.net/mailman/listinfo/spellyans_kernowek.net">http://kernowek.net/mailman/listinfo/spellyans_kernowek.net</a>
</pre>
    </blockquote>
    <br>
  </div>

_______________________________________________<br>Spellyans mailing list<br><a href="mailto:Spellyans@kernowek.net">Spellyans@kernowek.net</a><br>http://kernowek.net/mailman/listinfo/spellyans_kernowek.net<br></blockquote></div><br></div></div></body></html>