<html>
<head>
<meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=utf-8">
</head>
<body bgcolor="#FFFFFF" text="#000000">
I recently received a copy of 'The Cornish Consonantal System'. Here's a few random comments and questions.
<br>
<br>
<br>
You might want to check the back cover, considering the amount of mileage a certain editor got out of 'An event of great signicance' [sic]
<span class="moz-smiley-s1"><span>:-)</span></span><br>
<br>
<br>
I was delighted to see that 'argans' (p.47) is now being translated as 'silver, money'. Up until now, I had wondered  why Cornish was the only language in which innovation was prohibited.<br>
<br>
<br>
I found it strange, considering the subject matter and title, that Chaudhri's 2007 PhD thesis does not appear in the references. I  seem to remember him saying quite a lot about preocclusion, the 'prosodic shift', and assibilation and palatization. Any particular
 reason  why he was left out? <br>
<br>
<br>
I would have preferred data tables and percentages, with perhaps a few examples, rather than just long lists of examples (e.g. the stressed g/b,
<br>
unstressed k/p lists). <br>
<br>
<br>
In chapter 2, several of the references are incorrect. In Sections 2.2 and 2.3, for example:<br>
 <br>
OM312 'wrek' - you mean OM322 I think.<br>
BM1409 'tek' is not correct. The manuscript has 'wek'. People need to stop using Stokes' transcription of this manuscript, he is not totally reliable.<br>
BM1072 'carrek' is not correct. Stokes has 'carek' (also incorrect). The manuscript has 'kaɼɘk'. Again, stop using Stokes!
<br>
<br>
<br>
There are others... <br>
<br>
<br>
I was wondering, why do you think there are so many examples of stressed <k,g> (presumably you would say, for [g]) rhyming with unstressed <k,g>
<br>
(presumably you would say, for [k]), and vice versa? <br>
<br>
<br>
Here is a quick list from the examples in 2.2: (references are the same as in the book)
<i><br>
<br>
</i><br>
'gwrek' etc. <br>
<br>
<br>
PA66c - rhymes with 'moreȝek'<br>
BM302 - rhymes with 'galosek'<br>
BM2508 - rhymes with 'meryasek'<br>
BM2786 - rhymes with 'meryasek' <br>
<br>
<br>
'tek' etc. <br>
<br>
<br>
PA244b rhymes with 'marrek','lowenek'<br>
OM552 rhymes with 'lowenek'<br>
OM2155 - rhymes with 'ovnek'<br>
OM2462 - rhymes with 'vuthek'<br>
PC36 - rhymes with 'whansek'<br>
BM1424 - rhymes with 'connek'<br>
BM 2134 - rhymes with 'meryasek'<br>
BM2624 - rhymes with 'meryasek'<br>
BM2806 - rhymes with 'meryasek'<br>
BM3069 - rhymes with 'anhethek'<br>
BM4336 - rhymes with ' meryasek'<br>
BM4421 - rhymes with ' galosek'<br>
 <br>
'whek' etc.<br>
 <br>
PA47b - rhymes with 'dowȝek', 'moloȝek', 'cronek'<br>
PA66b rhymes with 'moreȝek'<br>
PA77d rhymes with 'voreȝek', 'ownek', 'sethek'<br>
PA232a rhymes with 'moreȝek'<br>
PA244c rhymes with  'marrek','lowenek'<br>
OM451 rhymes with 'lowenek', 'govenek'<br>
OM2258 rhymes with 'ankenek'<br>
PC35 rhymes with 'whansek'<br>
PC2331 rhymes with 'anwhek'<br>
BM298 rhymes with 'galosek'<br>
BM329 rhymes with 'meryasek'<br>
BM347 rhymes with 'galosek', 'lowenek'<br>
BM527 rhymes with 'meryasek'<br>
BM1329 rhymes with 'galosek'<br>
BM2758 rhymes with 'meryasek'<br>
BM2763 rhymes with 'meryasek'<br>
BM3119 rhymes with 'vohosek'<br>
BM4195 rhymes with 'meryasek'<br>
BM4249 rhymes with 'bohosek'<br>
BM4558 rhymes with 'meryasek'<br>
 <br>
 <br>
Anyway, you get the idea...I can think of a few possibilities:<br>
 <br>
(i) The Middle Cornish poets were the worst poets in history, even worse than me:<i><br>
<br>
<br>
</i>
<blockquote><i>There once was a man named Hawkey,</i><i><br>
</i><i><br>
</i><i>Who went on a walk to Bosworgey.</i><i><br>
</i><i><br>
</i><i>He carried a bag,</i><i><br>
</i><i><br>
</i><i>And a heavy rucksack</i><i><br>
</i><i><br>
</i><i>But turned around when it got foggy.<br>
<br>
<span class="moz-smiley-s7"><span>:-\</span></span><br>
</i><br>
</blockquote>
<i><br>
(ii) It was perfectly acceptable to rhyme [k] with [g] in middle Cornish.<br>
 <br>
(iii) Stressed and unstressed words alike had either [k] or [g] or some other similar sound.<br>
 <br>
(iv) The sound at the end of these words varied (according to position, the following word, etc.)<br>
<br>
<br>
What do you think?<br>
</i><br>
<br>
<i>Pask lowen dhewgh whei oll!</i><br>
</body>
</html>