<html><head><base href="x-msg://132/"></head><body style="word-wrap: break-word; -webkit-nbsp-mode: space; -webkit-line-break: after-white-space; ">Many thanks, Ian.<div><br></div><div>Certainly for Penwith (pennwydh?), "end-aspect" makes a lot more sense than "trees!"  Not that we didn't have trees in antiquity, of course.   We did, but hardly remarkable in comparison with other, more wooded, areas of Cornwall.</div><div><br></div><div>Anowr,</div><div>Craig</div><div><br></div><div><br></div><div><br></div><div><br><div><div>On 2017 Ebr 25, at 17:33, <<a href="mailto:iacobianus@googlemail.com">iacobianus@googlemail.com</a>> <<a href="mailto:iacobianus@googlemail.com">iacobianus@googlemail.com</a>> wrote:</div><br class="Apple-interchange-newline"><blockquote type="cite"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="border-collapse: separate; font-family: 'Color Emoji', Calibri, 'Segoe UI', Meiryo, 'Microsoft YaHei UI', 'Microsoft JhengHei UI', 'Malgun Gothic', sans-serif; font-style: normal; font-variant: normal; font-weight: normal; letter-spacing: normal; line-height: normal; orphans: 2; text-align: -webkit-auto; text-indent: 0px; text-transform: none; white-space: normal; widows: 2; word-spacing: 0px; -webkit-border-horizontal-spacing: 0px; -webkit-border-vertical-spacing: 0px; -webkit-text-decorations-in-effect: none; -webkit-text-size-adjust: auto; -webkit-text-stroke-width: 0px; font-size: medium; "><div dir="ltr"><div data-externalstyle="false" dir="ltr" style="font-family: Calibri, 'Segoe UI', Meiryo, 'Microsoft YaHei UI', 'Microsoft JhengHei UI', 'Malgun Gothic', sans-serif; font-size: 12pt; "><div>Dear All,</div><div><br></div><div>With apologies to Dr George, he refers to gwedh in his entry for tirwedh, but in fact there is only one gwedh in the<span class="Apple-converted-space"> </span><em>Gerlyver Meur</em>, the one meaning ‘aspect’ which Dr George believes may legitimately be used as a simplex, so I am quite wrong to ascribe the folk etymology to him! And of course in Common Cornish the entry for trees is under gwydh.</div><div><br></div><div>Best regards,</div><div><br></div><div>Ian<br></div><div data-signatureblock="true"><br></div><div style="padding-top: 5px; border-top-color: rgb(229, 229, 229); border-top-width: 1px; border-top-style: solid; "><div><font face=" 'Calibri', 'Segoe UI', 'Meiryo', 'Microsoft YaHei UI', 'Microsoft JhengHei UI', 'Malgun Gothic', 'sans-serif'" style="line-height: 15pt; letter-spacing: 0.02em; font-family: Calibri, 'Segoe UI', Meiryo, 'Microsoft YaHei UI', 'Microsoft JhengHei UI', 'Malgun Gothic', sans-serif; font-size: 12pt; "><b>From:</b> <a href="mailto:craig@agantavas.org" target="_parent">Craig Weatherhill</a><br><b>Sent:</b> ‎Tuesday‎, ‎25‎ ‎April‎ ‎2017 ‎16‎:‎08<br><b>To:</b> <a href="mailto:spellyans@kernowek.net" target="_parent">spellyans@kernowek.net</a></font></div></div><div><br></div><div dir=""><div id="readingPaneBodyContent">We have <tirwedh> for "landscape".  How does the second element of this word (presumably <*gwedh>) translate into English?<br>I need opinions for the Penwith Landscape Partnership, please.<br><br>I note that <tirwel> is also in current use.  That of course, is rather simpler to unravel - <tir> + <gwel>, "prospect, view".<br><br>Craig<br><br><br><br><br>_______________________________________________<br>Spellyans mailing list<br><a href="mailto:Spellyans@kernowek.net">Spellyans@kernowek.net</a><br><a href="http://kernowek.net/mailman/listinfo/spellyans_kernowek.net">http://kernowek.net/mailman/listinfo/spellyans_kernowek.net</a><br></div></div></div>_______________________________________________<br>Spellyans mailing list<br><a href="mailto:Spellyans@kernowek.net">Spellyans@kernowek.net</a><br><a href="http://kernowek.net/mailman/listinfo/spellyans_kernowek.net">http://kernowek.net/mailman/listinfo/spellyans_kernowek.net</a><br></div></span></blockquote></div><br></div></body></html>