<html><head></head><body style="word-wrap: break-word; -webkit-nbsp-mode: space; -webkit-line-break: after-white-space; "><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Constantia" size="4">With great sadness, I must pass on a report of the passing of R.R.M. (Richard) Gendall, at the age of 93.</font><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Constantia" size="4"><br></font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Constantia" size="4">I remember him telling me that he began to learn Cornish at the age of 4, and I doubt that anyone else in the 20th or 21st century has spoken Cornish for 89 years!</font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Constantia" size="4">Singer, songwriter, schoolteacher, linguist, Richard contributed so much to Cornish society and culture and yet was so curiously unsung.</font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Constantia" size="4"><br></font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Constantia" size="4">I fondly remember voyages to Treguier, Brittany, with Richard and Jan in his boat 'Keryades', which he kept at St Winnow.</font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Constantia" size="4"><br></font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Constantia" size="4">His "The Pronunciation of Cornish", a careful and insightful analysis of Edward Lhuyd's phonetically written style of recording traditional Cornish is, to my mind, the most important of all his many works,</font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Constantia" size="4">and should be properly published.</font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Constantia" size="4"><br></font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Constantia" size="4">My thoughts are with his widow, Jan, and all of Richard's family.</font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Constantia" size="4"><br></font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Constantia" size="4">Cusk yn cres, Richard Gendall (1924-2017).</font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Constantia" size="4"><br></font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Constantia" size="4"><br></font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Constantia" size="4">Craig</font></div><div><br></div><div><br></div><div><br></div><div><br><div><div>On 2017 Gwn 14, at 10:15, Nicholas Williams wrote:</div><br class="Apple-interchange-newline"><blockquote type="cite"><meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html charset=utf-8"><div style="word-wrap: break-word; -webkit-nbsp-mode: space; -webkit-line-break: after-white-space;" class=""><font size="4" class="">The poster for the special Eucharist in Truro Cathedral</font><div class=""><font size="4" class="">for St German’s day, </font><span style="font-size: large;" class="">2 October, </span><span style="font-size: large;" class="">says that the</span></div><div class=""><font size="4" class="">service will be "<i class="">yn Kernowek, Sowsnek ha Latinek</i>.”</font></div><div class=""><font size="4" class=""><br class=""></font></div><div class=""><font size="4" class="">The name of the third language in that list is questionable.</font></div><div class=""><font size="4" class=""><br class=""></font></div><div class=""><font size="4" class="">In traditional Cornish the language Latin is invariably called <b class="">Latyn</b>:</font></div><div class=""><font size="4" class=""><br class=""></font></div><div class=""><div style="margin: 0px; line-height: normal;" class=""><font size="4" class=""><i class="">pan ve luen ov zor a wyn ny gara covs mes <b class="">laten</b></i> ‘when my belly is full of wine I like to speak Latin only’ BM 80-1</font></div></div><div style="margin: 0px; line-height: normal;" class=""><font size="4" class=""><br class=""></font></div><div style="margin: 0px; line-height: normal;" class=""><div style="margin: 0px; line-height: normal;" class=""><font size="4" class=""><i class="">yma ow signifia pup kynde a foode, beva foode an corfe po food an Ena, ha in della yma oll an girryow <b class="">latyn</b></i> ‘it means every kind of food, whether food for the body or food for the soul, and thus do all the Latin words signify’ TH 57a</font></div><div style="margin: 0px; line-height: normal;" class=""><font size="4" class=""><br class=""></font></div><div style="margin: 0px; line-height: normal;" class=""><div style="margin: 0px; line-height: normal;" class=""><font size="4" class=""><i class="">Ma ko them cavaz tra a’n par ma en lever Arlyth an Menneth dro tho e deskanz <b class="">Latten</b></i> ‘I remember finding something similar in Montaigne’s book about his Latin education’ NBoson</font></div><div style="margin: 0px; line-height: normal;" class=""><font size="4" class=""><br class=""></font></div><div style="margin: 0px; line-height: normal;" class=""><div style="margin: 0px; line-height: normal;" class=""><font size="4" class=""><i class="">en leeaz Gerreau, a dael bose gwrez aman durt an <b class="">Latten</b> po an Souseneack</i> ’in many words which must have been constructed from the Latin or the English'  NBoson</font></div><div style="margin: 0px; line-height: normal;" class=""><font size="4" class=""><br class=""></font></div><div style="margin: 0px; line-height: normal;" class=""><div style="margin: 0px; line-height: normal;" class=""><font size="4" class=""><i class="">En Tavaz Greka, <b class="">Lathen</b> ha’n Hebra, En Frenkock ha Carnoack deskes dha</i> ‘In the Greek language, Latin and the Hebrew,</font></div><div style="margin: 0px; line-height: normal;" class=""><font size="4" class="">in French and Cornish well schooled’ JBoson.</font></div><div style="margin: 0px; line-height: normal;" class=""><br class=""></div><div style="margin: 0px; line-height: normal;" class=""><font size="4" class="">Nicholas Williams</font></div></div></div></div></div></div>_______________________________________________<br>Spellyans mailing list<br><a href="mailto:Spellyans@kernowek.net">Spellyans@kernowek.net</a><br>http://kernowek.net/mailman/listinfo/spellyans_kernowek.net<br></blockquote></div><br></div></body></html>