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A comparison of Cornish orthographies and the requirements they meet

The table below shows how seven orthographies for Cornish meet a number of linguistic requirements which can be identified based on discussions over the past year.
  • The Single Written Form should be able to support both Middle Cornish and Late Cornish pronunciation preferences.
  • The Single Written Form should enable readers who have learned the reading rules to pronounce an unfamiliar word when they encounter it, particularly with regard to vowel length.
  • The Single Written Form should enable readers who prefer pre-occluded pronunciation to know which words have it and which do not.
  • The Single Written Form should use traditional orthographic forms as far as is possible within a systematic and logical structure.
  • The Single Written Form should be able to support both literary/conservative verbal constructions as well as colloquial/advanced verbal constructions.
  • The Single Written Form should be able to mark anomalous stress regularly. (It is not clear that this is an important user requirement, since it has never really been addressed or considered to be an issue in UC, RLC, CC, or UCR.)
RequirementJennerUCRLCCCUCRKSKD
Supports Middle Cornish pronunciationNoYesNoYesYesYesYes
Supports Late Cornish pronunciationYesNoYesNoNoYesYes
Marks vowel length clearlyYesNoYesYesNoYesYes
Marks pre-occlusion clearlyYesNoYesNoNoYesYes
Uses traditional orthographic formsYesYesYesNoYesYesYes
Supports colloquial conjugationsYesNoYesNoYesYesYes
Supports literary conjugationsYesYesNoYesYesYesYes
Marks anomalous stressNoNoNoNoNoNoYes
Score6353478
Only KS and KD succeed in supporting both Middle Cornish and Late Cornish pronunciation. For a Cornish orthography to be inclusive, it must support both dialects. Anything that does not cannot possibly attract consensus because RLC users will reject it. (This is a more central problem than the quibbles between the three forms based on Middle-to-Tudor phonology.)