<html><body style="word-wrap: break-word; -webkit-nbsp-mode: space; -webkit-line-break: after-white-space; "><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Baskerville" size="5"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 18px;">Degoyth is a compound of cotha 'fall'. The stress is on the first syllable.</span></font><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Baskerville" size="5"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 18px;">Gostoyth is gostyth in CW and the second syllable is unstressed.</span></font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Baskerville" size="5"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 18px;">Not infrequently boys 'to be' is written, although the word never had a diphthong.</span></font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Baskerville" size="5"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 18px;">This, I believe, is because oy (OC ui) monophthongised to o: and thus fell together with o: </span></font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Baskerville" size="5"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 18px;">from other sources. </span></font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Baskerville" size="5"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 18px;">This is why bos to be is often boys, and boys 'food' < OC buit is often bos.</span></font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Baskerville" size="5"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 18px;"><br></span></font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Baskerville" size="5"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 18px;">Nicholas</span></font></div><div><br></div><div><br></div><div><div><div>On 2 Nov 2008, at 13:59, Tom Trethewey wrote:</div><br class="Apple-interchange-newline"><blockquote type="cite"><table cellspacing="0" cellpadding="0" border="0"><tbody><tr><td valign="top" style="font: inherit;">Impossible to tell without a time-machine. Is the <oy> in <em>degoyth</em> and <em>wostoyth</em> stressed or unstressed?<br><br>--- On <b>Sun, 2/11/08, Michael Everson <i><<a href="mailto:everson@evertype.com">everson@evertype.com</a>></i></b> wrote:<br> <blockquote style="PADDING-LEFT: 5px; MARGIN-LEFT: 5px; BORDER-LEFT: rgb(16,16,255) 2px solid">From: Michael Everson <<a href="mailto:everson@evertype.com">everson@evertype.com</a>><br>Subject: Re: [Spellyans] "become" with nouns<br>To: "Standard Cornish discussion list" <<a href="mailto:spellyans@kernowek.net">spellyans@kernowek.net</a>><br>Date: Sunday, 2 November, 2008, 1:53 PM<br><br><pre>On 2 Nov 2008, at 13:45, Tom Trethewey wrote:

> Why spell degoth with <o>, when in the verse quoted it is spelled
with <oy> and rhymes with another word in <oy>?

The <oy> means [o:], does it not?

Michael Everson * <a href="http://www.evertype.com">http://www.evertype.com</a>


_______________________________________________
Spellyans mailing list
<a href="mailto:Spellyans@kernowek.net">Spellyans@kernowek.net</a>
<a href="http://kernowek.net/mailman/listinfo/spellyans_kernowek.net">http://kernowek.net/mailman/listinfo/spellyans_kernowek.net</a>
</pre></blockquote></td></tr></tbody></table><br>       _______________________________________________<br>Spellyans mailing list<br><a href="mailto:Spellyans@kernowek.net">Spellyans@kernowek.net</a><br>http://kernowek.net/mailman/listinfo/spellyans_kernowek.net<br></blockquote></div><br></div></body></html>