<html><body style="word-wrap: break-word; -webkit-nbsp-mode: space; -webkit-line-break: after-white-space; "><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Baskerville" size="5"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 18px;">The Welsh variant caly implies that there was orignally something after the l.</span></font><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Baskerville" size="5"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 18px;">Moreover the Irish congener calg 'prick' (of an insect) seems to indicate that the original etymon</span></font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Baskerville" size="5"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 18px;">was *kalg-. </span></font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Baskerville" size="5"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 18px;">This does not justify the Cornish form *calgh/kalgh. We know that Calesvol is the regular form</span></font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Baskerville" size="5"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 18px;">of 'Excalibur' < *kaledo-bulk- and the equivalent of Welsh dal, Breton dalc'h is probaly attested</span></font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Baskerville" size="5"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 18px;">in</span> po res <b>dal</b> an vor, na oren pana tu, Thuryan, Houlzethas, Gogleth po Dihow in Pryce.</font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Baskerville" size="5"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 18px;">In Cornish the sequence /lx/ become /l/ in absolute final.</span></font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Baskerville" size="5"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 18px;"><br></span></font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Baskerville" size="5"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 18px;">Nicholas</span></font></div><div style="text-align: justify; text-indent: -14px;"><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Baskerville"><br></font></div><div><br><div><div>On 5 Jan 2009, at 15:53, Jon Mills wrote:</div><br class="Apple-interchange-newline"><blockquote type="cite"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="border-collapse: separate; color: rgb(0, 0, 0); font-family: Helvetica; font-size: 12px; font-style: normal; font-variant: normal; font-weight: normal; letter-spacing: normal; line-height: normal; orphans: 2; text-align: auto; text-indent: 0px; text-transform: none; white-space: normal; widows: 2; word-spacing: 0px; -webkit-border-horizontal-spacing: 0px; -webkit-border-vertical-spacing: 0px; -webkit-text-decorations-in-effect: none; -webkit-text-size-adjust: auto; -webkit-text-stroke-width: 0; "><div style="margin-top: 0cm; margin-right: 0cm; margin-bottom: 0cm; margin-left: 0.3cm; ">So did Breton acquire the final /-x/ or did Cornish and Welsh lose it?</div></span><br class="Apple-interchange-newline"></blockquote></div><br></div></body></html>