<html><body style="word-wrap: break-word; -webkit-nbsp-mode: space; -webkit-line-break: after-white-space; "><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Baskerville" size="5"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 18px;">Earlier today I gave a short paper at an international conference on translation in Trinity College, Dublin.</span></font><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Baskerville" size="5"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 18px;"><br></span></font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Baskerville" size="5"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 18px;">The title of the conference was "Translation Right or Wrong".</span></font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" size="5"><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Baskerville">see</font><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 18px;"> <a href="http://www.tcd.ie/langs-lits-cultures/postgraduate/literary_translation/conference2009.php">http://www.tcd.ie/langs-lits-cultures/postgraduate/literary_translation/conference2009.php</a></span></font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Baskerville" size="5"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 18px;"><br></span></font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Baskerville" size="5"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 18px;">My paper was on translating the scriptures into Cornish. </span></font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Baskerville" size="5"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 18px;">All the examples of the right and the wrong way to translate the Bible into Cornish were</span></font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Baskerville" size="5"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 18px;">taken from published portions of the scriptures, most notably the two available</span></font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Baskerville" size="5"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 18px;">versions of the New Testament.</span></font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Baskerville" size="5"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 18px;"><br></span></font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Baskerville" size="5"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 18px;">I also pointed out that Nance's word  *Bybel was probably not correctly formed, being borrowed from Breton Bibl.</span></font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Baskerville" size="5"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 18px;">If the word had been borrowed from Middle English, it would appear</span></font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Baskerville" size="5"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 18px;">in Cornish as *Bybla; cf. Irish Bíobla.</span></font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Baskerville" size="5"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 18px;">If, as is more likely, it had been borrowed after the Reformation,</span></font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Baskerville" size="5"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 18px;">the word would appear in Cornish as *Beybel; cf. Welsh Beibl.</span></font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Baskerville" size="5"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 18px;"><br></span></font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Baskerville" size="5"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 18px;">In which case, the title THE HOLY BIBLE is best rendered in the revived language as AN BEYBEL SANS.</span></font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Baskerville" size="5"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 18px;"><br></span></font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Baskerville" size="5"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 18px;">Nicholas</span></font></div><div><br></div><div><br></div></body></html>