<html xmlns:o="urn:schemas-microsoft-com:office:office" xmlns:w="urn:schemas-microsoft-com:office:word" xmlns="http://www.w3.org/TR/REC-html40">

<head>
<meta http-equiv=Content-Type content="text/html; charset=utf-8">
<meta name=Generator content="Microsoft Word 11 (filtered medium)">
<style>
<!--
 /* Font Definitions */
 @font-face
        {font-family:"Palatino Linotype";
        panose-1:2 4 5 2 5 5 5 3 3 4;}
 /* Style Definitions */
 p.MsoNormal, li.MsoNormal, div.MsoNormal
        {margin:0cm;
        margin-bottom:.0001pt;
        font-size:12.0pt;
        font-family:"Times New Roman";}
a:link, span.MsoHyperlink
        {color:blue;
        text-decoration:underline;}
a:visited, span.MsoHyperlinkFollowed
        {color:purple;
        text-decoration:underline;}
p.MsoPlainText, li.MsoPlainText, div.MsoPlainText
        {margin:0cm;
        margin-bottom:.0001pt;
        font-size:10.0pt;
        font-family:"Palatino Linotype";}
@page Section1
        {size:595.3pt 841.9pt;
        margin:70.85pt 101.55pt 2.0cm 101.5pt;}
div.Section1
        {page:Section1;}
-->
</style>

</head>

<body lang=DE link=blue vlink=purple>

<div class=Section1>

<p class=MsoPlainText><font size=2 color=navy face="Palatino Linotype"><span
lang=EN-GB style='font-size:10.0pt;color:navy'>-----Original Message-----<br>
From: Michael Everson<br>
Sent: Monday, April 06, 2009 11:40 AM</span></font><font color=navy><span
lang=EN-GB style='color:navy'><o:p></o:p></span></font></p>

<p class=MsoPlainText><font size=2 face="Palatino Linotype"><span lang=EN-GB
style='font-size:10.0pt'><o:p> </o:p></span></font></p>

<p class=MsoPlainText><font size=2 color=navy face="Palatino Linotype"><span
lang=EN-GB style='font-size:10.0pt;color:navy'>“</span></font><span lang=EN-GB>On
4 Apr 2009, at 18:13, Daniel Prohaska wrote:<o:p></o:p></span></p>

<p class=MsoPlainText><font size=2 face="Palatino Linotype"><span lang=EN-GB
style='font-size:10.0pt'><o:p> </o:p></span></font></p>

<p class=MsoPlainText><font size=2 face="Palatino Linotype"><span lang=EN-GB
style='font-size:10.0pt'>> Michael wrote:<o:p></o:p></span></font></p>

<p class=MsoPlainText><font size=2 face="Palatino Linotype"><span lang=EN-GB
style='font-size:10.0pt'>> “Why is Dan following George's gaver pl gever
(with -ar in the  <o:p></o:p></span></font></p>

<p class=MsoPlainText><font size=2 face="Palatino Linotype"><span lang=EN-GB
style='font-size:10.0pt'>> sing.)? And what is the explanation for
"gyffres" given "gifras"  <o:p></o:p></span></font></p>

<p class=MsoPlainText><font size=2 face="Palatino Linotype"><span lang=EN-GB
style='font-size:10.0pt'>> and  "geffraz"? (Certainly there is no
need for two f's.)<font color=navy><span style='color:navy'>”</span></font><o:p></o:p></span></font></p>

<p class=MsoPlainText><font size=2 face="Palatino Linotype"><span lang=EN-GB
style='font-size:10.0pt'>><o:p> </o:p></span></font></p>

<p class=MsoPlainText><font size=2 face="Palatino Linotype"><span lang=EN-GB
style='font-size:10.0pt'>> I’m not giving gavar, but gaver, you cited it
yourself.<o:p></o:p></span></font></p>

<p class=MsoPlainText><font size=2 face="Palatino Linotype"><span lang=EN-GB
style='font-size:10.0pt'><o:p> </o:p></span></font></p>

<p class=MsoPlainText><font size=2 face="Palatino Linotype"><span lang=EN-GB
style='font-size:10.0pt'>I know. Nance and Williams and Gendall all have gavar.”<o:p></o:p></span></font></p>

<p class=MsoPlainText><font size=2 color=navy face="Palatino Linotype"><span
lang=EN-GB style='font-size:10.0pt;color:navy'><o:p> </o:p></span></font></p>

<p class=MsoPlainText><font size=2 color=navy face="Palatino Linotype"><span
lang=EN-GB style='font-size:10.0pt;color:navy'>And the texts and the place names
overwhelmingly have <b><i><span style='font-weight:bold;font-style:italic'>gaver</span></i></b>.
<o:p></o:p></span></font></p>

<p class=MsoPlainText><font size=2 color=navy face="Palatino Linotype"><span
lang=EN-GB style='font-size:10.0pt;color:navy'><o:p> </o:p></span></font></p>

<p class=MsoPlainText><font size=2 color=navy face="Palatino Linotype"><span
lang=EN-GB style='font-size:10.0pt;color:navy'>“</span></font><span lang=EN-GB>>
This is attested in MC. In Lhuyd the -ar means schwa + r. This can  <o:p></o:p></span></p>

<p class=MsoPlainText><font size=2 face="Palatino Linotype"><span lang=EN-GB
style='font-size:10.0pt'>> be shown as gaver as well.<o:p></o:p></span></font></p>

<p class=MsoPlainText><font size=2 face="Palatino Linotype"><span lang=EN-GB
style='font-size:10.0pt'><o:p> </o:p></span></font></p>

<p class=MsoPlainText><font size=2 face="Palatino Linotype"><span lang=EN-GB
style='font-size:10.0pt'>Why would it be a good idea to have gaver instead of
gavar in the singular? To me the sg/pl alternation gavar/gever is more
sensible.<font color=navy><span style='color:navy'>”<o:p></o:p></span></font></span></font></p>

<p class=MsoPlainText><font size=2 color=navy face="Palatino Linotype"><span
lang=EN-GB style='font-size:10.0pt;color:navy'><o:p> </o:p></span></font></p>

<p class=MsoPlainText><font size=2 color=navy face="Palatino Linotype"><span
lang=EN-GB style='font-size:10.0pt;color:navy'>Why, if <b><i><span
style='font-weight:bold;font-style:italic'>gaver</span></i></b> is attested. In
other cases you argue in favour of a form that is based on textual attestation.
Why is this case different. Just to be different to KK? <o:p></o:p></span></font></p>

<p class=MsoPlainText><font size=2 color=navy face="Palatino Linotype"><span
lang=EN-GB style='font-size:10.0pt;color:navy'><o:p> </o:p></span></font></p>

<p class=MsoPlainText><font size=2 color=navy face="Palatino Linotype"><span
lang=EN-GB style='font-size:10.0pt;color:navy'>“</span></font><span lang=EN-GB>>
>From the SWF’s rule to give the etymological vowel<o:p></o:p></span></p>

<p class=MsoPlainText><font size=2 face="Palatino Linotype"><span lang=EN-GB
style='font-size:10.0pt'><o:p> </o:p></span></font></p>

<p class=MsoPlainText><font size=2 face="Palatino Linotype"><span lang=EN-GB
style='font-size:10.0pt'>That "rule" is most objectionable, because
it means "do what Ken George reconstructed in KK" and there is enough
wrong with his reconstructions to think twice before accepting any of the
holus-bolus. Indeed I doubt the AGH took a considered view on this when they (or
Albert and Ben) made this "rule".”<o:p></o:p></span></font></p>

<p class=MsoPlainText><font size=2 color=black face="Palatino Linotype"><span
lang=EN-GB style='font-size:10.0pt;color:black'><o:p> </o:p></span></font></p>

<p class=MsoPlainText><font size=2 color=navy face="Palatino Linotype"><span
lang=EN-GB style='font-size:10.0pt;color:navy'>I do not interpret this rule as
meaning “Ken George’s reconstruction”.<o:p></o:p></span></font></p>

<p class=MsoPlainText><font size=2 face="Palatino Linotype"><span lang=EN-GB
style='font-size:10.0pt'><o:p> </o:p></span></font></p>

<p class=MsoPlainText><font size=2 color=navy face="Palatino Linotype"><span
lang=EN-GB style='font-size:10.0pt;color:navy'>“</span></font><span lang=EN-GB>>
the discussion is irrelevant anyway because it’s an epenthetic  <o:p></o:p></span></p>

<p class=MsoPlainText><font size=2 face="Palatino Linotype"><span lang=EN-GB
style='font-size:10.0pt'>> vowel anyway, cf. W gafr.<o:p></o:p></span></font></p>

<p class=MsoPlainText><font size=2 face="Palatino Linotype"><span lang=EN-GB
style='font-size:10.0pt'><o:p> </o:p></span></font></p>

<p class=MsoPlainText><font size=2 face="Palatino Linotype"><span lang=EN-GB
style='font-size:10.0pt'>Then it isn't an ETYMOLOGICAL -e-, is it?<font
color=navy><span style='color:navy'>”<o:p></o:p></span></font></span></font></p>

<p class=MsoPlainText><font size=2 color=navy face="Palatino Linotype"><span
lang=EN-GB style='font-size:10.0pt;color:navy'><o:p> </o:p></span></font></p>

<p class=MsoPlainText><font size=2 color=navy face="Palatino Linotype"><span
lang=EN-GB style='font-size:10.0pt;color:navy'>My point entirely, which is why
I said the discussion was irrelevant. Since <b><i><span style='font-weight:
bold;font-style:italic'>gaver</span></i></b> is the attested form in the texts,
that’s the one I prefer. It suits all our requirements. It shows the
pronunciation and is authentic in that we find it spelt thus in traditional
Cornish.<o:p></o:p></span></font></p>

<p class=MsoPlainText><font size=2 color=navy face="Palatino Linotype"><span
lang=EN-GB style='font-size:10.0pt;color:navy'><o:p> </o:p></span></font></p>

<p class=MsoPlainText><font size=2 face="Palatino Linotype"><span lang=EN-GB
style='font-size:10.0pt'>“> Nicholas Boson and Andrew Boorde give gever as
the plural which  <o:p></o:p></span></font></p>

<p class=MsoPlainText><font size=2 face="Palatino Linotype"><span lang=EN-GB
style='font-size:10.0pt'>> seems to be cognate to W geifr. Gyffras is the
plural found in TH,  <o:p></o:p></span></font></p>

<p class=MsoPlainText><font size=2 face="Palatino Linotype"><span lang=EN-GB
style='font-size:10.0pt'>> with <ff>. Should we simplify <ff> to
<f> if it’s not attested, I  <o:p></o:p></span></font></p>

<p class=MsoPlainText><font size=2 face="Palatino Linotype"><span lang=EN-GB
style='font-size:10.0pt'>> wonder?<o:p></o:p></span></font></p>

<p class=MsoPlainText><font size=2 face="Palatino Linotype"><span lang=EN-GB
style='font-size:10.0pt'><o:p> </o:p></span></font></p>

<p class=MsoPlainText><font size=2 face="Palatino Linotype"><span lang=EN-GB
style='font-size:10.0pt'><f> is never [v] in the SWF or KS.<o:p></o:p></span></font></p>

<p class=MsoPlainText><font size=2 face="Palatino Linotype"><span lang=EN-GB
style='font-size:10.0pt'><o:p> </o:p></span></font></p>

<p class=MsoPlainText><font size=2 face="Palatino Linotype"><span lang=EN-GB
style='font-size:10.0pt'>> Could it mean /</span></font><span lang=EN-GB>ˈgivrəs/?</span><span
lang=EN-GB><o:p></o:p></span></p>

<p class=MsoPlainText><font size=2 face="Palatino Linotype"><span lang=EN-GB
style='font-size:10.0pt'><o:p> </o:p></span></font></p>

<p class=MsoPlainText><font size=2 face="Palatino Linotype"><span lang=EN-GB
style='font-size:10.0pt'>Maybe that's what Nance was thinking, but I think it's
/</span></font><span lang=EN-GB>ˈgifrəs/, </span><span lang=EN-GB>which I think
we should spell gyfras.<o:p></o:p></span></p>

<p class=MsoPlainText><font size=2 face="Palatino Linotype"><span lang=EN-GB
style='font-size:10.0pt'><o:p> </o:p></span></font></p>

<p class=MsoPlainText><font size=2 face="Palatino Linotype"><span lang=EN-GB
style='font-size:10.0pt'>I remain unconvinced that there are good reasons to
change from gavar/gever to gaver/gever in KS. Jon? Nicholas?”<font color=navy><span
style='color:navy'><o:p></o:p></span></font></span></font></p>

<p class=MsoPlainText><font size=2 color=navy face="Palatino Linotype"><span
lang=EN-GB style='font-size:10.0pt;color:navy'><o:p> </o:p></span></font></p>

<p class=MsoPlainText><font size=2 color=navy face="Palatino Linotype"><span
lang=EN-GB style='font-size:10.0pt;color:navy'>What do you mean, change? Is
there an established KS spelling of <b><i><span style='font-weight:bold;
font-style:italic'>gaver</span></i></b>?<o:p></o:p></span></font></p>

<p class=MsoPlainText><font size=2 color=navy face="Palatino Linotype"><span
lang=EN-GB style='font-size:10.0pt;color:navy'>Dan<o:p></o:p></span></font></p>

<p class=MsoPlainText><font size=2 color=navy face="Palatino Linotype"><span
lang=EN-GB style='font-size:10.0pt;color:navy'><o:p> </o:p></span></font></p>

</div>

</body>

</html>